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Ongoing economic uncertainty and a slowdown in government technology investment continue to delay or limit the adoption of digital innovation and radically redesigned service models. But CIOs at all levels of government can help ease the path. Part of the problem is that the structure of government has remained largely unchanged for more than half a century, while the needs and expectations of citizens and businesses have outpaced the ability to adequately address them. Technological capabilities and social forces have now converged to move government organisations beyond simple online efficiencies. Technology now enables them to optimise, transform or create entirely new services, while renovating back-end systems. As the digitalisation of society progresses, many government organisations are focused on digital transformation strategies. Gartner believes their CIOs need to take the lead in opening government to citizens and industry, while breaking down the traditional barriers that stifle innovation.   Leading the transition CIOs can lead the transition to optimised and secure public services by adopting organisational capabilities that take advantage of available digital and data analytics technologies. In addition to deploying proven technologies – the cloud, social, mobile, data analytics and the Internet of Things (IoT) – to support the optimisation and transformation of government services, CIOs should explore the potential of emerging trends. These include blockchain, distributed ledgers and applied artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. Government organisations are increasingly operating in large digital ecosystems. Public and private sector enterprises, competitors, customers and citizens, regulators and other stakeholders are forming interdependent, coexisting business networks. While these ecosystems will give CIOs unprecedented opportunities to revolutionise government business, they also add an entirely new dimension of technical complexity and risk. Given the pivotal role of information in digital ecosystems, CIOs must affirm the value of their role by stepping beyond hardware provisioning or network performance. Instead, the need to pay attention to design standards-based digital platforms that focus innovation on citizen experience and service model transformation, while promoting rapid experimentation and change. This increased organisational visibility and leadership responsibility are changing the CIO’s role to that of a business executive who is also competent in technology and data management.   Developing an effective strategy Many government organisations struggle to articulate a compelling business vision to base a digital strategy on. There is often confusion about how previous eGovernment objectives differ from those of digital transformation. Digital government relies on the use and reuse of data and analytics to simplify transactions for end users. It creates information from data to support and enhance decision making. It fosters the creation of new, collaborative and disruptive service delivery models. In the process, underlying service models are re-engineered to improve mission effectiveness and to achieve long-range cost savings through optimised outcomes. Government leaders recognise the critical role of data as a strategic asset. It is the innovative use and reuse of digital data that powers business transformation and delivers value that is recognised by legislative bodies, citizens and the workforce. Leveraging its vast repositories of data, government leaders can drive transformative change by ensuring that data is semantically defined and available, accessible and readily shareable. It can then be analysed and combined to create new value streams across wide service networks. To be successful, a digital government strategy must address a variety of issues. These include:
  • Establishing a sustainable collaboration among stakeholders in different domains and tiers
  • Adopting more flexible funding, agile procurement and project management processes
  • Improving IT workforce skills and management practices
  • Securing the technologies and services needed to support the digitalisation of government business functions.
  Successfully implementing a strategy There are many challenges that affects a digital government strategy. These include the workload impact of increased levels of migrants and asylum seekers on border control, the struggle to boost economic growth and curb unemployment, the improvement of education, retirement and health care for an aging population, and continuous pressure to reduce the cost of government. All of this needs to be done while staying on pace with the increasing levels of government services that citizens require. Digital government strategies are shaped by the level of direct citizen interaction. Activities such as motor vehicle registration and licensing, social services, law enforcement or the adjudication of legal cases, are often administered in collaboration with other agencies and jurisdictions. This drives the need for better application integration and interoperability across back-office systems, so that front office, point-of-service interactions are effective and efficient. Where citizens or businesses engage with government more frequently, CIOs face greater urgency to transform their public services to deliver better outcomes within a large portfolio of services, and with severe resource constraints. Successful digital strategic planning and implementation require strong governance maturity to ensure that these initiatives deliver real business and mission value on shorter time horizons, while positioning the government organisation to continually develop its digital capabilities, sustainably across administrations. When appropriations are tied to individual programs that operate in silos, CIOs must develop strong collaborative relationships among peer executives to ensure visible and sustained business sponsorship, direction, oversight and support. Rick Holgate is a research director at Gartner, advising government CIOs on digital government, cloud, mobility, digital workplace, information security, IT procurement, shared services, case management and legacy system modernisation. He will speak about the future of digital government at Gartner Symposium/ITxpo in Australia, 30 October-2 November 2017. [post_title] => CIOs and the transition to digital government [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => cios-transition-digital-government [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-16 14:20:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-16 03:20:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=28285 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28233 [post_author] => 673 [post_date] => 2017-10-10 15:05:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-10 04:05:59 [post_content] =>

Sydney’s Barangaroo Reserve has won the prestigious best landscape design of the year award in the 2017 international American Architecture Prize. The 22-hectare headland park was designed by Australian landscape architects Johnson Pilton Walker in association with PWP Landscape Architecture, a firm based in Berkeley near San Francisco, and built by Lend Lease. It opened in August 2015. The prize is awarded annually. There are 41 prizes across three categories: architecture, interior design and landscaping. The Barangaroo award was one of only three ‘best in show’ awards. There were other awards for Australia in this year’s prizes. Sydney firm FJMT (Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp) won the Tall Buildings award for its EY Centre in Sydney’s CBD, and Perth firm Iredale Pedersen Hook won awards for Perth Zoo’s Orangutan Exhibit and Boardwalk Experience, and for domestic architecture with its Casa31_4 house. “Barangaroo is a globally-significant waterfront renewal project that redefines Sydney Harbour and its Central Business District,” says the award citation. “Barangaroo Reserve was the first phase in the three-district precinct to open. The project re-creates Millers Point headland in its original location by transforming a concrete container port into a naturalistic park with over 75,000 plantings native to the Sydney region. “Guided by historical maps and paintings, the design of the headland includes a foreshore of 10,000 sandstone blocks excavated directly from the site. “Walking and bicycle pathways separated by the ‘1836 Wall’ symbolically mark the original precolonial shoreline. Barangaroo Reserve is carbon-neutral, water-positive, and committed to creating zero waste. “Selected as a Clinton Global Initiative, One Planet Living, and C40 Climate Positive development, the project recycled all existing materials onsite to form the headland. “Hidden beneath the artificial headland, the ‘Cutaway’ is a massive void formed through the sandstone excavation operations to host art exhibits, performances, and a future Aboriginal Cultural Centre. “Barangaroo Reserve transforms a huge expanse of empty concrete into humane, usable space, marking the transformation of an industrialised site into a modern reinvention of its more sustainable past.”   [post_title] => Barangaroo wins US landscaping award [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => barangaroo-wins-us-landscaping-award [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-13 08:47:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-12 21:47:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=28233 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28218 [post_author] => 673 [post_date] => 2017-10-09 07:05:34 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-08 20:05:34 [post_content] => The Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) has published a report on ‘Measuring infrastructure asset performance and customer satisfaction: A review of existing frameworks’. “Well-managed, modern and functioning infrastructure underpins much of Australia’s economic prosperity, “ said BITRE’s head Dr Gary Dolman, releasing the report. “Services provided by roads, rail, ports, telecommunications networks and energy infrastructure are essential inputs into the activities of most Australian businesses. Infrastructure performance therefore has implications beyond the infrastructure sector. “Yet current infrastructure performance measures often reflect the priorities of infrastructure owners and/ or operators rather than those of customers, and therefore may overlook the changing needs of customers.” The report was prepared with from the Better Infrastructure Initiative (BII) at the John Grill Centre for Project Leadership at the University of Sydney, which has been undertaking research into how to manage Australia’s infrastructure assets for long-term efficiency gains. It provides a review of existing infrastructure performance measures and performance measurement frameworks in Australia and elsewhere, and how customer preferences might be better incorporated to improve the long-term efficiency of operation of Australia’s infrastructure assets. “While some infrastructure asset types, namely public roads and airports, have made significant progress in performance measurement, for others there is a dearth of information or public engagement,” said Dr Dolman. “The patchwork approach that has resulted means that Australia may be missing out on the potential benefits of consistent and widespread performance measurement: improved accountability, incentivised performance, and better performance evaluation. “This report introduces and explores many of the issues surrounding infrastructure performance measurement that should be considered in the context of providing greater consistency across infrastructure asset types.” The report is available (PDF) here. Originally established as the Bureau of Transport Economics in 1970, BITRE) provides economic analysis, research and statistics on infrastructure, transport and regional development issues to inform Australian Government policy development and wider community understanding. It is contained within the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development. It employs 30 staff, mostly economists, statisticians, modellers, social researchers and policy analysts. [post_title] => How to measure infrastructure [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-measure-infrastructure [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-10 15:13:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-10 04:13:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=28218 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28180 [post_author] => 673 [post_date] => 2017-10-05 10:14:21 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-04 23:14:21 [post_content] => The Federal Government’s Digital Transformation Agency (DTA) has called for feedback on ways to improve its Digital Service Standard. The 13 point Standard was released 18 months ago. It is intended as a guide to help Government agencies ensure they build digital services that are “simple, clear and fast.” It has also been informally adopted by a number of state government agencies. The DTA said in a statement announcing the call for comment that the Standard has been working well for some agencies, but that “for other agencies it’s a bit more difficult. “We want to know what’s working well, what’s not so great and what barriers agencies may come across when they’re trying to use that Standard.” Feedback can be submitted through the DTA’s website here. The DTA will also be conducting research interviews with a range of agencies and people who have used the Standard. The Standard was adapted from a similar 18 point set of guidelines in use in the UK Government (the Digital by Default Service Standard). It provides a range of principles that agencies should follow as the implement the digital delivery of their services. The DTA has built a series of detailed guides and handbooks to implementing the Standard, outlining a Discovery, and Alpha and a Beta stage. These include metrics to enable agencies to measure the effectiveness of their digital service delivery. The 13 points:
  1. Understand user needs: Research to develop a deep knowledge of the users and their context for the service.
  2. Establish a sustainable multidisciplinary team to design, build, operate and iterate the service, led by an experienced product manager with decision-making responsibility.
  3. Design and build the service using the service design and delivery process, taking an agile and user-centred approach.
  4. Understand the tools and systems required to build, host, operate and measure the service and how to adopt, adapt or procure them.
  5. Make it secure: Identify the data and information the service will use or create. Put appropriate legal, privacy and security measures in place.
  6. Consistent and responsive design: Build the service with responsive design methods using common design patterns and the style guide.
  7. Build using open standards and common government platforms where appropriate.
  8. Make all new source code open by default.
  9. Ensure the service is accessible to all users regardless of their ability and environment.
  10. Test the service from end to end, in an environment that replicates the live version.
  11. Measure performance against KPIs set out in the guides. Report on public dashboard.
  12. Don’t forget the non-digital experience: Ensure that people who use the digital service can also use the other available channels if needed, without repetition or confusion.
  13. Encourage everyone to use the digital service and consolidate or phase out existing alternative channels where appropriate.
[post_title] => DTA calls for input on new Standard [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => dta-calls-input-new-standard [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-06 10:26:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-05 23:26:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=28180 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28099 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-09-25 12:13:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-25 02:13:38 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_28102" align="alignnone" width="287"] Unlikely as it seems but The Rock, NSW, is an innovation hub. Photo by Golden Wattle - own work, via WikiPedia.[/caption] Kim Houghton, University of CanberraInnovation is the highest in regional centres that have research and development institutions and there are only 26 of these in regional Australia. But more than 150 regional areas have potential to match this innovation, a new index finds. In conjunction with the Regional Australia Institute, we’ve developed an Innovation Index that maps the national spread of two complementary aspects of innovation – research and development, and 'business dynamo'. The measure of research and development is focused on technical expertise and the number of applications for patents, and the business dynamo measure incorporates startup rates, trademarks and the number of business-to-business services. Judging by these two measures, it’s true that big cities are the nation’s key innovation assets. One cause of this is the number of registered research and development institutions (174 out of around 200 nationwide), which are located in our big cities. This is to where much of the research and development investment flows. But there are 49 local government areas like Hobart (Tas), Palerang and Yass Valley (NSW/ACT), Queenscliff (Vic), Toodyay (WA) and Darwin (NT) that score highly in both measures of the index. These areas combine a local business network with a high rate of trademark applications. This suggests that existing businesses in these places are innovating successfully. The concerning contrast to this are Australia’s old industrial centres, such as Burnie and Glenorchy (Tas), Port Pirie (SA), Broken Hill (NSW) and Benalla (Vic). There are 195 areas like this across Australia, which have lost many businesses and jobs over the last 20 years. They are also among the worst performers in terms of innovation in regional Australia. This 195 included a large number of areas with low populations, agricultural industries and areas that are remote. There were 77 local government areas that scored strongly in engineering, science, and research and development, but weaker in the business dynamo measure. These areas are largely a mix of longstanding mining and minerals processing, like Whyalla (SA), Mt Isa (Qld), Muswellbrook and Singleton (NSW Hunter Valley), and new mining hotspots like Karratha (WA), Pilbara (WA), Weipa (QLD) and Roxby Downs (SA). We found 110 areas were strong in business dynamo but with limited research and development capacity. These areas usually have strong lifestyle appeal like Hepburn (Vic), the Gold and Sunshine Coasts (Qld), Claire Valley and Victor Harbour (SA) and Busselton (WA). This also includes regional entrepreneurial centres like Griffith (NSW) and Ballarat (Vic).

How regional areas are innovating

Innovation in regional Australia is big business. A Commonwealth Bank report found regional businesses perform better than their metropolitan counterparts on measures like asking employees for new ideas and looking to benefit from technology changes. The report estimated that regional businesses are seeing a financial return from their investment in innovation to be an average of A$279,000, contributing A$19 billion to the economy each year. If all regional businesses reached this benchmark, the report believes the regional economy could grow by A$44 billion every year. We found there are many regional businesses using innovative approaches and technologies to solve problems for not only their own communities, but others as well. One example is Therapy Connect, a business founded in Deniliquin, NSW, that operates solely online. It has become recognised as a leader in the field of providing online speech and occupational therapy supports to children and families in Australia. The business has provided services to over 25 new regional areas across states and territories in Australia and reaches as far as Asia, all from its own regional bases in New South Wales & Victoria. Another example is business Pointer Remote Role, a platform that matches professional candidate profiles with roles that can be conducted remotely and that are specific to their skill set and experience. Think hookup app Tinder, but for remote employment. The business is based in The Rock, NSW, and was started to create a more level playing field for professionals living regionally. States, too, are active. Queensland has a Regional Innovation Hubs program, which is starting to fund spaces and activities to foster innovation in regional places. NSW, too, has an augmented NSW incubators and accelerators program, and South Australia has both early stage and venture capital funds. Mapping out these regional innovation ecosystems gives us a better idea of how these interventions can be even more targeted to addressing known weaknesses. Longreach’s Entrepreneur in Residence is a great example of how dedicated people and a little financial support can address a key gap. Longreach in Central West Queensland hosted an Entrepreneur in Residence, Daniel Johnsen, from California. Johnsen is a US-based Startup Weekend facilitator and mentor. These Startup Weekends are 54-hour events, where different people gather to pitch ideas for new startups, form teams around those ideas, and work to develop a working prototype, demo, or presentation by the Sunday evening. Johnsen set up the first Startup Weekend Outback Edition in August. He said:
"The pitches and ideas were on par with those that I have seen all over the world. I look forward to facilitating another one in the region before my time as Entrepreneur in Residence finishes next June."
The ConversationThis is the kind of targeted approach, involving partnerships and collaboration with regional innovators and resource organisations, that’s needed to lift other regions performing badly in the index, to innovate better. Kim Houghton, Adjunct Associate Professor IGPA, University of Canberra This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. [post_title] => Innovate in the regions [post_excerpt] => Which local government areas are the powerhouses when it comes to innovation? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => heres-49-small-communities-innovating-well-big-cities [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-25 12:29:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-25 02:29:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://governmentnews.com.au/?p=28099 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28078 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-09-21 20:49:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-21 10:49:44 [post_content] => The Australian Information Industry Association (AIIA) has released the findings of a national survey on Australians’ attitudes towards technology and its impact on future employment opportunities. While nearly all Australians believe that innovation is important to Australia’s future prosperity (99%) and feel positive about future work and job opportunities (97%), only one in four attribute their positive outlook to the belief that government will develop the right policies in areas such as education and training. Instead, people were more likely to attribute their positive attitude about the future to the fact that technological revolutions throughout history have always resulted in the emergence of new industries and jobs (54%), Australia is a strong, stable country that will be able to adapt to change (52%), and because Australian entrepreneurs will take advantage of emerging opportunities in new industries (45%). The survey on Australians’ attitude towards innovation, jobs and future employment was conducted by Galaxy Research on behalf of AIIA*. “There is widespread commentary that technological disruption will cause job loss without job replacement. However, our poll indicates the majority of Australians are actually positive about the future, despite fear mongering about loss of jobs as technology develops,” said Rob Fitzpatrick, CEO of AIIA. “The survey also found that the majority of Australians believe they will need to take charge of their own careers and reskilling as jobs evolve due to technology advancements, irrespective of the industry in which they are working.” To adapt to technological change, Australians say workers need to stay up to date with changing technology in their industry (76%), undertake self-learning/further education (55%), access professional development through their workplace (53%), and be prepared to change careers or jobs as new roles emerge (51%).  “History has demonstrated that technology and automation have increased productivity, improved the quality of goods and services, reduced prices and led to improved standards of living. It’s great that people are prepared to manage their own careers, however, it’s crucial that industry and government also respond appropriately to ensure Australians are well positioned to take advantage of new jobs and industries that will emerge on the back of new technologies,” said Mr Fitzpatrick. The survey indicated many Australians believe it is vitally important to support young people so they are prepared for the jobs of the future. The most popular approach is to improve education standards and the curriculum in STEM subjects (68%), while large numbers also said Australia should provide more workplace training opportunities for university and high school students (64%), develop more relevant vocational and education training programs (59%), and develop programs that promote resilience and confidence in young people (53%). Areas respondents would like to see embracing innovation and technology include medical research and development to deliver cures and better health management (72%), helping disadvantaged people gain better access to appropriate support services (65%), and investing in technological change in existing Australian industries such as manufacturing and agriculture (58%). The survey results coincide with the release of AIIA's Skills for Today, Jobs for Tomorrow whitepaper, which focuses on the urgent need for a practical strategy and action plan for the future of jobs. “ICT and digital leaders must work proactively with governments and communities to develop practical strategies to build Australia’s digital literacy capabilities to prevent social and economic dislocation,” said Mr Fitzpatrick. “While history shows technology will ultimately add productivity and economic growth, our whitepaper is the start of what needs to be an ongoing conversation about developing an action plan to ensure Australians are adequately prepared for the jobs of the future,” he said. * The Galaxy Poll was conducted online among a nationally representative sample of 1,004 Australians 18 years and older. [post_title] => Technology, jobs, and government input [post_excerpt] => What impact will new technologies have on future employment, and what's the government's role? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => future-jobs-technology-government-input [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-21 20:52:10 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-21 10:52:10 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://governmentnews.com.au/?p=28078 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28052 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-09-18 13:21:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-18 03:21:00 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_28053" align="alignnone" width="300"] Cameron Offices on the corner of College Street and Chandler Way, Belconnen, ACT. Source: Wikipedia user Adz.[/caption] With the aim of driving greater efficiency in the management of the Commonwealth’s property portfolio, three property service providers have been appointed. The providers are Broadspectrum Property Pty Ltd (Broadspectrum), Evolve FM Pty Ltd (Evolve FM), and Jones Lang LaSalle (ACT) Pty Ltd (JLL). They will provide leasing and facilities management services to over 90 Commonwealth entities. These appointments are part of the Government’s plan to realise further savings in excess of $100 million in property-related expenditure over the four years of the contracts, including through consolidating the Commonwealth’s buying power. The new property service provider arrangements complement other efficiency measures already in place, including Operation Tetris (see below), which had a goal of realising savings of $300 million over 10 years through reductions in surplus leased property holdings. The appointment of the providers followed an open tender process and represents strong outcomes for Indigenous business and small to medium enterprises (SME). Each Property Service Provider has committed to exceed the Indigenous Procurement Policy targets of 3 per cent for levels of Indigenous employment and/or engagement of downstream contractors. The Property Service Providers are also required to meet or exceed the Government’s SME targets of 10 per cent of downstream contract value. Broadspectrum and JLL are large, established global providers. Evolve FM is an Australian-based, Indigenous-owned company. The appointments are for an initial term until 30 June 2021, with possible extensions of up to a further four years. Operation Tetris squeezes more in The Department of Finance’s property efficiency program consists of:
  • Absorbing entities’ lease requirements, where feasible, into existing vacant office accommodation (Operation Tetris) undertaken in the ACT in 2015-16 and rolled out nationally from 2016-17.
  • Ensuring that leases and other property services are delivered through coordinated procurements that will maximise the Commonwealth’s substantial purchasing power.
In support of Operation Tetris, the government established a ‘Whole-of-Australian-Government’ coordinated procurement system for property-related services. This arrangement covers leasing services and property and facilities management for domestic office accommodation and shopfronts. The coordinated approach for property-related services is designed to improve the efficiency of property services across the Commonwealth and maximise the value for money that can be achieved by consolidating the Commonwealth’s purchasing power. All non-corporate commonwealth entities (NCCE) will be required to commence using the arrangements for their outsourced property needs once their existing contracts expire. NCCE will, however, be able to enter into new contracts, including any extensions or expansions to existing property-related arrangements (excluding leases), as long as those contracts expire before 30 June 2018. Lease arrangements will remain subject to Resource Management Guide 504 (RMG 504) in respect of endorsement by the Minister for Finance. Since the national roll-out, the government claims Operation Tetris has successfully filled over 60,000 square metres of vacant and surplus office space in the ACT and a further 7,000 square metres in other capital cities, including:
  • A reduction in the median work point vacancy rate from 20.9 per cent (2015) to 13.8 per cent (2016).
  • A reduction in net lettable area leased by the Commonwealth from 3.13 million square metres in 2015 to 2.89 million square metres in 2016.
  [post_title] => Govt outsources office management [post_excerpt] => The Commonwealth has appointed three service providers to manage its property portfolio. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => commonwealth-outsources-office-management [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-18 13:30:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-18 03:30:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://governmentnews.com.au/?p=28052 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28019 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-09-14 16:28:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-14 06:28:43 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_28020" align="alignnone" width="300"] Lismore City Council ranger Craig Devonshire with the new body cameras worn by compliance staff.[/caption] Lismore City Council compliance staff will permanently wear body cameras following a successful six-month trial of the surveillance equipment. Lismore has been trialling the technology among compliance staff including rangers and environmental health compliance officers. The cameras are used whenever a staff member is engaged to undertake an activity – from picking up a dangerous dog to issuing a parking fine – and the footage is then stored in an off-site location to prevent tampering. Each of the high-definition cameras can record 21 hours of video and audio, and compliance coordinator Matt Kelly said often simply having the cameras switched on can de-escalate potentially volatile scenarios. “Everyone tends to act more reasonably when they know they are being recorded – the cameras can often take the heat out of a situation because people are more conscious and aware of their actions,” he said. “From both a staff perspective and for members of the public, it provides transparency and ensures everyone is 100% accountable for their behaviour.” Matt said neighbouring councils had shown interest in the technology and he was pleased to report the trial had already been met with approval by the community and staff. “The feedback we have had so far has been very positive,” Matt said. “We want our community members to feel protected and we also want our staff to feel secure in performing their duties. The body cameras are a simple and effective way to provide peace of mind for everyone.”   [post_title] => Body cameras the new normal for compliance staff [post_excerpt] => Lismore City Council compliance staff will permanently wear body cameras. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => body-cameras-new-normal-compliance-staff-lismore [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-15 11:34:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-15 01:34:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://governmentnews.com.au/?p=28019 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27993 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-09-11 12:56:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-11 02:56:20 [post_content] => City of Darebin council in the northern suburbs of Melbourne is implementing business process management software to enhance the council’s focus on improved frontline customer service. The City of Darebin has a population of more than 150,000. The council’s full-time employees are responsible for providing a broad range of services to the community, including street lighting and signage, waste collection, maintenance of parks and sporting facilities. The move follows a comprehensive review by the council of customer service team processes as part of a customer service model review to ensure that policies and procedures relevant to customer queries are close at hand. At the same time, the council wants to provide an easy and fast way for staff to access a central repository of everyday processes. The cloud-based software will enable the organisation to map, review and improve processes on an ongoing basis, providing a faster, smarter way to deliver a range of appropriate and well-planned services. Coordinator of council planning and performance, civic governance and performance Jim Barrett at the City of Darebin said: “The software will assist in supporting the council’s strategic framework for planning and document integration. At the same time, it will play a pivotal role in enabling us to maintain a high level of governance across the entire organisation. “These processes involve many forms and include applications such as planning permits and waste bin replacements, which individually can be complex procedures and involve several departments within the council.” It will also enable the council to measure and demonstrate process efficiencies following rate capping. “We came across the Promapp system through our council colleagues in the local government sector and also appreciated the benefit of access to its local government shared process library that will enable us to share knowledge and learn from the experience of other councils throughout Australia and New Zealand,” said Mr Barrett. The cloud-based process library includes over 2,500 processes developed and shared by councils and includes processes for activities such as building consents, resource consents, wastewater management, environmental health and environmental monitoring. “The software will easily integrate with our existing intranet and we'll be able to embed it ad hoc within specific processes for different policies as they are developed in the years ahead,” said Mr Barrett. “The council plans to use lean management methodologies as part of our deployment to analyse and improve processes on an ongoing basis. The result for council residents is that they will see consistency in messaging with faster, more accurate service,” said Mr Barrett.   [post_title] => City of Darebin to boost customer service [post_excerpt] => City of Darebin is implementing business process management to enhance its focus on customer service. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => city-darebin-boost-customer-service [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-11 12:56:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-11 02:56:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://governmentnews.com.au/?p=27993 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27986 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-09-08 07:46:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-07 21:46:59 [post_content] => Brian Halstead The NSW Government has spent $360 million on grants to fund its council amalgamation program and $200 million more for communities in an aim to hide the fact that forced council mergers are financially failing. These figures are contained in government documents on local government reform and the new $200 million ‘Stronger Communities’ payouts in country and regional NSW. We believe these grants are political sweeteners to soften an electoral backlash against the state Coalition because of forced mergers. Following a ten-week study and research in response to savings being voiced by the Local Government Minister Gabrielle Upton and publicity issued by the state Coalition, there appear to be serious unexplained shortfalls in most amalgamated council figures. As justification for NSW council amalgamations, the State Government promised surpluses for the first year (2017/18) of $82.3 million in metro councils and 20-year savings for regional and rural councils of $232million. We studied seven metro and 13 regional and country amalgamated councils. In metro councils, based on the councils’ 2017/18 proposed plans, deficits are forecast in total to be $1.3 million rather than the $82.5 million surplus the government promised in its proposals. The shortfalls on a comparable basis vary from $19 million in the new Inner West Council and $17.4 million in Cumberland, with many more councils in large shortfall territory. In the country and regions, Central Coast has a 20-year proposed savings figure of $115 million. In the council’s own 2017/18 forecast, the Central Coast has a deficit forecast of $8 million. In the 2017/18 general fund, Mid Coast Council will have a $15.4 million deficit, Queanbeyan $17.3 million, Snowy Monaro $4.4m, and Cootamundra nearly $2.5 million. The list of deficits goes on. One of the key benefits of amalgamated councils as claimed by the Baird/Berejiklian government was the expected improved financial performance compared with the previous stand-alone pre-amalgamated councils. The figures show the councils have failed miserably to deliver the surpluses promised by the State Government in the amalgamation proposals. The councils also fail in most cases to deliver the surpluses, that in total the individual councils committed to make standing alone or actually made three years earlier. Unless the amalgamated councils produce reconciliations with the government proposals, the overall amalgamated proposals will be seen to be a smoke and mirrors spin process supported by a secret KPMG Report. The amalgamations clearly appear not to be delivering the financial benefits promised. While we welcome the fact that the court proceedings in Sydney and in country and regional NSW have been withdrawn, we are still very concerned that many NSW councils are unable to deny amalgamations through legal proceedings. The communities must be given a say on whether the amalgamations that have taken place should be reversed as they are failing to deliver. Brian Halstead is an accountant, the author of the study and president of the Save Our Councils Coalition. [post_title] => Are merged councils financially secure? [post_excerpt] => A ten-week study and research has shown up shortfalls in some amalgamated council figures. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => merged-councils-financially-secure [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-08 10:53:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-08 00:53:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://governmentnews.com.au/?p=27986 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27953 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-09-06 14:51:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-09-06 04:51:11 [post_content] => The Australian National University (ANU) has announced a 10-year program to drive an artificial intelligence revolution in Australia. The expansion will be led by one of the world’s top technologists, Professor Genevieve Bell, and will be based within the ANU College of Engineering and Computer Science. Professor Bell recently joined ANU from Intel as the first of five appointments under the ANU Vice-Chancellor’s Entrepreneurial Fellows scheme. She has also been appointed the inaugural Florence Violet McKenzie Chairperson at ANU, named in honour of Australia’s first female electrical engineer. Under the expansion, Professor Bell will lead a new Autonomy, Agency and Assurance Institute, to be known as the 3A Institute, co-founded with CSIRO’s Data61, Australia’s largest data innovation network. The 3A Institute will bring together researchers from around the world and a range of disciplines to tackle complex problems around artificial intelligence, data and technology and managing their impact on humanity. ANU Vice-Chancellor Professor Brian Schmidt said ANU was driven to help solve the most pressing problems facing the world and the new institute will drive innovation, research and policy responses. “It isn’t just about engineering and computer science, it’s also about anthropology, sociology, psychology, economics, philosophy, public policy and many other disciplines – you have got to put it all together to get to the best answers possible,” Professor Schmidt said. “Professor Bell’s extraordinary experience and depth of knowledge in this area will ensure Australia remains prepared to meet the big social, cultural and political questions around our technological future.” Data61 CEO Adrian Turner said the 3A Institute would build on Australia’s strengths in cyber systems. “Australia has an opportunity to be a leader and to seed new industries of global relevance as IT, biological and advanced materials disciplines converge and become data-driven,” he said. “Building on our national strengths in cyber-physical systems, interdisciplinary research is needed now more than ever to understand how we can integrate resulting new technologies into our lives for economic and societal benefit. “The 3A Institute will be an important way for us to achieve this and move the nation forward. Data61 is delighted to be contributing talent and resources towards this collaboration as Founding Partner.” Professor Bell said there was a critical set of questions to be answered around autonomy, agency and assurance if the world is to meet challenges of future technology. “We, as humans, are simultaneously terrified, optimistic and ultimately ambivalent about what it’s going to be like,” she said. “How are we going to feel in a world where autonomous agents are doing things and we aren’t? How are we going to be safe in this world? “We will be looking closely at risk, indemnity, privacy, trust – things that fall under this broad term ‘assurance’.”   [post_title] => ANU, CSIRO to drive AI revolution [post_excerpt] => The ANU has announced major expansion to drive societal response to the artificial intelligence revolution. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => anu-csiro-drive-ai-revolution [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-09-08 10:49:02 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-09-08 00:49:02 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://governmentnews.com.au/?p=27953 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27943 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-08-30 20:00:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-30 10:00:31 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_27944" align="alignnone" width="300"] Vicki OHalloran AM.[/caption] Vicki O'Halloran AM, chief executive officer of Somerville Community Services has been appointed as the Northern Territory's 22nd Administrator by the Governor-General, His Excellency the Hon Sir Peter Cosgrove AK MC (Retd). Mrs O'Halloran's two-year appointment comes as the term of the current Administrator, the Hon John Hardy AO comes to a close on October 30 this year. Federal Minister for Local Government and Territories Senator the Hon Fiona Nash said Mrs Halloran is a long-term Territorian who had done great things in the disability and family services sector. “Mrs O'Halloran is a leader and advocate for the disability sector and is involved in a number of organisations locally and nationally. “She is a chairwoman and member of a number of boards and committees that do great things in the Territory, including National Disability Services, NT Government Ministerial Advisory Committees on Disability Reform, Red Tape Reduction Strategy, Council of Social Services, National Disability Insurance Scheme and Housing Innovation Working group. “She has devoted her entire career and many volunteer hours to welfare services throughout the Northern Territory and in 2014 was made a Member in the General Division of the Order of Australia (AM) for her significant service to people with a disability.” In 2015 Mrs O'Halloran was a state finalist for the Australian of the Year. Mrs O'Halloran, a Tasmanian by birth, took up an opportunity to relocate to Darwin in 1989 and has been the chief executive officer of Somerville Community Services for nearly 20 years. “Like many Territorians, Mrs O'Halloran never expected to stay longer than a couple of years and after 28 years is firmly entrenched in the Territory lifestyle and community,” chief minister Michael Gunner said. “Her tireless advocacy work in the family services and disability sector is known across the community, as is her reputation as a strategic and forward thinking leader. “I congratulate Mrs O'Halloran on her position and look forward to working with her over the next two years.” Ms O'Halloran will be officially sworn in by the Governor-General at a ceremony held in Parliament House on October 31. [post_title] => New administrator for NT [post_excerpt] => Vicki O'Halloran AM has been appointed as the Northern Territory's 22nd Administrator. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => new-administrator-nt [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-31 20:03:22 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-31 10:03:22 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://governmentnews.com.au/?p=27943 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27912 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-08-28 15:12:56 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-28 05:12:56 [post_content] => Michael Aaron For a technology that started out as the basis of cryptocurrency, blockchain has evolved to be so much more. Today, blockchain is poised to disrupt the way dozens of industries are operating, and set to revolutionise the public sector. Indeed, nine in ten government organisations globally plan to invest in blockchain for use in financial transaction management, asset management, contract management and regulatory compliance by 2018, and here in Australia, the trajectory looks similar. Last year, Data61 and Australian government agencies announced that they are undertaking a detailed study to determine what blockchain could all mean for both government and industry. The review will look to provide practical use cases where blockchain technology could be piloted in government services and the private sector, such as sharable registry information, verifiable supply chains and assessment of aggregate risk exposure in the financial services sector. Blockchain is a distributed database that can be used by individuals who want to complete transactions involving multiple parties. Large organisations can use it to collaborate across multiple organisational silos. Large, cross-industry ecosystems may want to use blockchain to handle complex transactions across multiple jurisdictions, and governments may want to use blockchain to help their citizens or in the delivery of new government applications. Trust has never been more important for governments in Australia and around the world. Globalisation means that governments need to find ways to expand the economy, and new ways to improve citizen engagement and accountability. The integration of blockchain technology into government activities will help local, state and federal governments move past a lack of trust, providing transparency for transactions. Ledgers have been used for centuries by governments and businesses to keep account of assets and liabilities, property, records and relevant transactions. But traditionally, ledgers were private and guarded, seen only by an internal few, or auditors. Blockchain takes this old and simple concept and takes it to a new level. Simply put, blockchain acts as a distributed open ledger that can be used to register and record property transactions, healthcare initiatives to track medical records, citizen services and much more. Day-to-day, blockchain can also help government processes and purchases more efficient, reducing the chances of fraud and error. In Australia, private sector organisations are already looking to blockchains as a potential new disruptor. For example, Agricultural technology business AgriDigital, executed the world’s first live settlement of the sale of an agricultural commodity on a blockchain with the sale of 23.46 tonnes of grain in central NSW. Australia Post, announced last year that it was looking at a blockchain technology project for the storing of digital identities, while AGL Energy will test how using blockchain technology could allow households to trade surplus energy from their rooftop solar panels. This initiative will also involve IBM and distributed energy advisers Marchment Hill Consulting and it is hoped it will highlight the regulatory and system changes needed to make the market work effectively, the value in peer-to-peer energy markets, as well as how blockchain technology can be leveraged to make it more effective. Because participants in a transaction on a blockchain have access to the same records, there is no need for third-party intermediaries to validate transactions or verify identities or ownership. Business licenses, property titles, vehicle registrations and other records could all be shifted to blockchains, freeing citizens from the need for lawyers, notaries and trips to government offices to certify that transactions are legal. Additionally, with blockchain consumers, business partners and government groups alike could know with certainty how things are made, stored, transported and sold – whether those assurances relate to child labor, materials or the environment. In a recent global study by IBM’s Institute for Business Value (IBV) and the Economist Intelligence Unit, it was found that government organisations around the world are prioritising blockchain to help reduce innovation roadblocks and inaccurate or incomplete information across their organisations. The results of the study show:
  • Seven in ten government executives predict blockchain will significantly disrupt the area of contract management, which is often the intersection of the public and private sectors
  • 14% of 'trailblazer' government institutions expect to have blockchain in production at scale by 2017, and are utilising blockchain to help reduce time, cost and risk in regulatory compliance, contract engagement, identity management and citizen services.
  • Six in ten governments recognise regulatory constraints as the greatest barrier to the adoption of blockchains, followed closely by what they perceive as immature technology and lack of executive buy-in
The study also found that Asia Pacific is setting the pace of adoption along with Western Europe, with North America trailing. But unlike Western Europe (which ranked 'financial transaction management' as the top area for new business models) and North America, (which focused on the potential of 'borderless services'), Asia Pacific governments expected 'citizen services' to be the area that delivered the greatest innovation through blockchain. Countries in the Asia Pacific region, including Australia, are set to be among the first to really grasp blockchain technology, with the government agencies taking on the technology. This could potentially see these governments begin to make transactions that in the past, they wouldn’t have – this comes down to blockchain addressing the lack of trust issue. Disruption, especially in bureaucratic institutions is rare. Decades later, even the Internet hasn’t drastically changed how governments operate and rarely do they compete in personalized citizen services. That could change as blockchains evolve to bring closer collaboration among citizens and government institutions. Open data (e.g. data that helps pinpoint the optimal location for a new retailer or record soil conditions for farmers) is arguably among a government’s greatest assets. As the societal value from that data grows, government organisations will need to ensure that their data is easily accessible, free to use and available in a consumable format. Likewise, institutions will need to take greater safeguards to protect that data from cyber-attacks. Open data on blockchains meets these imperatives, and can help governments become open governments. Through blockchain technology, government will be better able perform its dual role of facilitating the business innovation of citizens and, at the same time, co-creating better services for citizens, founded on openness and trust. Michael Aaron is the Blockchain leader at IBM.     [post_title] => Blockchain: from e-government to open government [post_excerpt] => The blockchain is set to revolutionise the public sector and disrupt the way dozens of industries are operating. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => blockchain-e-government-open-government [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-28 15:17:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-28 05:17:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://governmentnews.com.au/?p=27912 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27890 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-08-24 16:05:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-24 06:05:29 [post_content] =>
Last week, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull summoned the major electricity retailers to Canberra, to eyeball them and to tell them that everyone needs to do better. Putting aside the awkward staring contest, the parties did manage to agree on some small but important measures. Under the deal, the information available to consumers should improve, enabling them to more easily compare electricity offers and switch to a better offer. But does this deal really go far enough for consumers?
Power prices jumped on July 1 after three major retailers announced increases of up to 20 per cent. Picture: Anthony Hevron/Flickr.
A review of energy retail markets in Victoria, released on Sunday, goes a whole lot further. Led by former deputy premier of Victoria, John Thwaites, it calls for a new ‘Basic Service Offer’ – a regulated price for electricity. Until now, Victoria has led the way in opening up the retail electricity sector to competition; re-regulation would represent a major U-turn. During the 1990s, Australian governments began to break up the government-owned businesses responsible for electricity supply in each state, and introduced competition to the retail and wholesale links in the supply chain. The idea was that competition would deliver lower prices and encourage retailers to offer better and more innovative products and services. Anyone who pays an electricity bill knows that the reality hasn’t matched the promise. Now, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission is reviewing the competitiveness of the retail electricity sector and prices nationally. A preliminary report is due by the end of September, but we may not know until the final report next June whether the ACCC recommends more transparency, re-regulation, or something in between. For retailers in Victoria, the Thwaites review is the second reproach after we at the Grattan Institute raised concerns in a report called Price Shock in March. The two independent analyses suggest that the retail component of electricity bills is way too high. However, Victoria would be wise to await the findings of the ACCC because it will be able to review retailers’ actual data. In Price Shock, we recommended market reforms to improve transparency, and protections for vulnerable customers, with a regulated price being a last resort if the benefits of competition failed to emerge after initial reforms were implemented. The Thwaites review jumps straight to a regulated price.

What re-regulation would mean

If Victoria heads down this path, all retailers would have to offer customers a basic electricity service, at or below a price set by the regulator. But whether this reduces electricity bills, especially for those struggling to pay, will depend on the extent to which consumers take up the offer. There is a real risk that vulnerable but disengaged consumers will not make the switch and so will not get the benefits. Shopping around is not easy, so many consumers don’t know when or where better offers are available.
Market reforms would improve transparency, and protections for vulnerable customers. Picture: Pixabay
Alternatively, if all consumers switch to the basic offer, electricity prices would actually increase for some consumers. This is because current offers vary widely; some consumers are on very good deals while others are paying far too much. A new regulated price is unlikely to be as cheap as the best offers currently available. The best approach would be for the regulated basic price to be available on an ‘opt-out’ basis for vulnerable customers, while everyone else would have the option to ‘opt-in’. About a third of Victoria’s residential consumers are concession customers. They should all automatically be placed on the retailer’s cheapest offer – with the option to switch to a more expensive premium product if they choose. Other consumers could choose to switch to the cheapest offer, but they would have to take the initiative to make the switch. This would ensure that vulnerable consumers are protected, while helping to keep the price of the basic offer as low as possible.

Re-regulation is no panacea

Setting a regulated price isn’t easy. Too low, and retailers will topple over. Too high, and consumers will pay more. Another risk with re-regulation is that it will quash innovation. Product innovation is particularly important now because the electricity system is changing and consumer choice can help to drive that change. The basic offer need not be the only product that retailers make available to their customers. Some consumers would be willing to pay a premium for add-ons or alternative products - such as ‘green choice’ deals that support renewable energy, packages for solar households, and fixed cost ‘all you can eat’ electricity plans. Products that help consumers manage their electricity use could help to reduce system costs for everyone. For example, retailers could offer risk and reward options that consumers sign-up for, that reward consumers for reducing their electricity use during peak times and for making valuable contributions to the grid via solar panels and battery storage. Retailers will produce such innovative products if enough consumers show that they want more than a basic electricity service. Ultimately, reducing electricity prices will require a range of reforms that extend beyond the retail market to electricity generation and networks. In the meantime though, the onus is on retailers to prove the benefits of competition through lower prices and innovative offers.
Any reform of the electricity prices will need to beyond the retail market to electricity generation and networks. Picture: Wikimedia
Retailers will report back to the Prime Minister and the ACCC on Friday with their plans to improve affordability for their customers. The test will be: are these plans good enough to dissuade the Government from stepping in and re-regulating electricity prices? This article was first published on Pursuit. Read the original article.   [post_title] => Is re-regulation the solution to Australia’s electricity price shock? [post_excerpt] => The ACCC is reviewing the competitiveness of the retail electricity sector and prices nationally. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => re-regulation-solution-australias-electricity-price-shock [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-24 16:25:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-24 06:25:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://governmentnews.com.au/?p=27890 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 14 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 28285 [post_author] => 673 [post_date] => 2017-10-16 12:58:47 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-16 01:58:47 [post_content] =>

Ongoing economic uncertainty and a slowdown in government technology investment continue to delay or limit the adoption of digital innovation and radically redesigned service models. But CIOs at all levels of government can help ease the path. Part of the problem is that the structure of government has remained largely unchanged for more than half a century, while the needs and expectations of citizens and businesses have outpaced the ability to adequately address them. Technological capabilities and social forces have now converged to move government organisations beyond simple online efficiencies. Technology now enables them to optimise, transform or create entirely new services, while renovating back-end systems. As the digitalisation of society progresses, many government organisations are focused on digital transformation strategies. Gartner believes their CIOs need to take the lead in opening government to citizens and industry, while breaking down the traditional barriers that stifle innovation.   Leading the transition CIOs can lead the transition to optimised and secure public services by adopting organisational capabilities that take advantage of available digital and data analytics technologies. In addition to deploying proven technologies – the cloud, social, mobile, data analytics and the Internet of Things (IoT) – to support the optimisation and transformation of government services, CIOs should explore the potential of emerging trends. These include blockchain, distributed ledgers and applied artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. Government organisations are increasingly operating in large digital ecosystems. Public and private sector enterprises, competitors, customers and citizens, regulators and other stakeholders are forming interdependent, coexisting business networks. While these ecosystems will give CIOs unprecedented opportunities to revolutionise government business, they also add an entirely new dimension of technical complexity and risk. Given the pivotal role of information in digital ecosystems, CIOs must affirm the value of their role by stepping beyond hardware provisioning or network performance. Instead, the need to pay attention to design standards-based digital platforms that focus innovation on citizen experience and service model transformation, while promoting rapid experimentation and change. This increased organisational visibility and leadership responsibility are changing the CIO’s role to that of a business executive who is also competent in technology and data management.   Developing an effective strategy Many government organisations struggle to articulate a compelling business vision to base a digital strategy on. There is often confusion about how previous eGovernment objectives differ from those of digital transformation. Digital government relies on the use and reuse of data and analytics to simplify transactions for end users. It creates information from data to support and enhance decision making. It fosters the creation of new, collaborative and disruptive service delivery models. In the process, underlying service models are re-engineered to improve mission effectiveness and to achieve long-range cost savings through optimised outcomes. Government leaders recognise the critical role of data as a strategic asset. It is the innovative use and reuse of digital data that powers business transformation and delivers value that is recognised by legislative bodies, citizens and the workforce. Leveraging its vast repositories of data, government leaders can drive transformative change by ensuring that data is semantically defined and available, accessible and readily shareable. It can then be analysed and combined to create new value streams across wide service networks. To be successful, a digital government strategy must address a variety of issues. These include:
  • Establishing a sustainable collaboration among stakeholders in different domains and tiers
  • Adopting more flexible funding, agile procurement and project management processes
  • Improving IT workforce skills and management practices
  • Securing the technologies and services needed to support the digitalisation of government business functions.
  Successfully implementing a strategy There are many challenges that affects a digital government strategy. These include the workload impact of increased levels of migrants and asylum seekers on border control, the struggle to boost economic growth and curb unemployment, the improvement of education, retirement and health care for an aging population, and continuous pressure to reduce the cost of government. All of this needs to be done while staying on pace with the increasing levels of government services that citizens require. Digital government strategies are shaped by the level of direct citizen interaction. Activities such as motor vehicle registration and licensing, social services, law enforcement or the adjudication of legal cases, are often administered in collaboration with other agencies and jurisdictions. This drives the need for better application integration and interoperability across back-office systems, so that front office, point-of-service interactions are effective and efficient. Where citizens or businesses engage with government more frequently, CIOs face greater urgency to transform their public services to deliver better outcomes within a large portfolio of services, and with severe resource constraints. Successful digital strategic planning and implementation require strong governance maturity to ensure that these initiatives deliver real business and mission value on shorter time horizons, while positioning the government organisation to continually develop its digital capabilities, sustainably across administrations. When appropriations are tied to individual programs that operate in silos, CIOs must develop strong collaborative relationships among peer executives to ensure visible and sustained business sponsorship, direction, oversight and support. Rick Holgate is a research director at Gartner, advising government CIOs on digital government, cloud, mobility, digital workplace, information security, IT procurement, shared services, case management and legacy system modernisation. He will speak about the future of digital government at Gartner Symposium/ITxpo in Australia, 30 October-2 November 2017. [post_title] => CIOs and the transition to digital government [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => cios-transition-digital-government [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-10-16 14:20:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-10-16 03:20:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=28285 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 201 [max_num_pages] => 15 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 4c8819a17658e624de66a7bd8f7e960b [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

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eGOv

CIOs and the transition to digital government

Ongoing economic uncertainty and a slowdown in government technology investment continue to delay or limit the adoption of digital innovation and radically redesigned service models. But CIOs at all levels of government can help ease the path. Part of the problem is that the structure of government has remained largely unchanged for more than half […]

Barangaroo

Barangaroo wins US landscaping award

Sydney’s Barangaroo Reserve has won the prestigious best landscape design of the year award in the 2017 international American Architecture Prize. The 22-hectare headland park was designed by Australian landscape architects Johnson Pilton Walker in association with PWP Landscape Architecture, a firm based in Berkeley near San Francisco, and built by Lend Lease. It opened […]

BITRE

How to measure infrastructure

The Bureau of Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Economics (BITRE) has published a report on ‘Measuring infrastructure asset performance and customer satisfaction: A review of existing frameworks’. “Well-managed, modern and functioning infrastructure underpins much of Australia’s economic prosperity, “ said BITRE’s head Dr Gary Dolman, releasing the report. “Services provided by roads, rail, ports, telecommunications networks […]