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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30670" align="aligncenter" width="658"] Health, education and infrastructure are big ticket items in NSW's 2018 budget.[/caption]

Assertive outreach services and a new social impact investment are among the elements of a $1 billion homelessness package to be included in NSW’s budget today. 

Tailored support will be provided to rough sleepers, young people and victims of domestic violence under the package.

The program includes $20 million over four years to a social impact investment on homelessness to tap into the expertise of the private and not-for-profit sector.

It will provide for more assertive outreach services for rough sleepers, strengthened risk assessment to address individuals’ circumstances and enhanced support to maintain a tenancy.

Included in the program is $9.1 million for additional transitional accommodation, $6.9 million on co-located homeless and health services and $6.2 million to expand the Staying Home Leaving Violence program to five new sites.

The NSW Government’s budget will also contain $1 billion in new recurrent health funding to employ an extra 1370 workers, including 950 nurses and midwives, 300 doctors and 120 allied health professions.

The State Government says that brings the budget’s total health spend to $23 billion.

In education, the government will announce “the largest investment into schools by any state government in history” with funding of $6 billion over four years to deliver more than 170 new and upgraded schools. The budget contains funding for an extra 20 new and upgraded schools, the planning for which will begin this year.

Work will commence on 40 new and upgraded school projects this year.

In transport, the budget will outline a $1.5 billion investment in bus services throughout the state, which will see more than 2,000 extra bus services rolled out in the next 12 months.

The number of trains running in the morning and afternoon peaks on the T4 and T8 lines will be increased with an $880 million investment in technology to modernise the Sydney Trains network.

The key southern Sydney route Heathcote Road will get a $173 million package to improve safety and traffic flow, while $40 million will be spent sealing the last stretch of the Cobb and Silver City highways, meaning every major highway in the state will now be sealed.

In resources, the budget will also contain $23 million for the recently established Natural Resources Access Regulators to increase water compliance and enforcement.

The Australia Museum will undergo a $50 million refurbishment before it hosts Tutankhamun: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh, the largest Tutankhamun exhibition to ever leave Egypt, for a six-month run in early 2021.
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[post_title] => Boost for health workforce, homeless services in NSW budget [post_excerpt] => Assertive outreach services and a new social impact investment are among the elements of a $1 billion homelessness package to be included in NSW’s budget today. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => boost-for-health-workforce-homeless-services-in-nsw-budget [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-19 08:48:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-18 22:48:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30804 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30786 [post_author] => 675 [post_date] => 2018-06-18 16:50:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-18 06:50:02 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30787" align="aligncenter" width="655"] Data capture to predict risk in assets is among technologies being used by councils.[/caption] New and emerging technologies are helping councils to predict risk within infrastructure assets and improve accountability and service delivery. Campbelltown Council is spearheading innovative asset management after transforming its road management through an award-winning process that captures data and enables the prediction of risk in assets. With responsibility for $400 million in road assets and a growing population necessitating investment in infrastructure, developing a sustainable road management strategy was critical to optimising the council’s budget. The infrastructure asset management team developed a method to capture data on the condition of assets and automatically generate a risk score for each asset. [caption id="attachment_30789" align="alignright" width="179"] Mahbub Hossain[/caption] Mahbub Hossain, coordinator of asset services at Campbelltown Council, said that in automating risk assessments the technology helps to significantly mitigate asset risk, reduce the renewal backlog and improve service levels. “The program enabled us to identify and deliver desired levels of service for users of council’s assets, reduce the life-cycle cost of maintaining asset stock and reduce the risk of infrastructure asset failure,” he said. The management of risk is at the centre of all asset management processes, particularly for determining and monitoring intervention levels and prioritising asset maintenance, he said. The asset condition score, which is measured on a scale of one to 10 (one being ‘very poor condition’ and 8-10 being ‘excellent condition’) is used to prioritise maintenance and improve service delivery. The implementation of the program enables complex risk assessments to be completed more efficiently, according to Mr Hossain. “In order to determine the priority of maintenance requirements the defects of all assets are compared in terms of the probability of failure and the consequences of failure. A risk score for every component for all assets is automatically generated. By ranking the risk scores, a risk-based maintenance program is generated.” Prior to 2000, councils’ financial constraints limited it to 10 to 20 major projects per year, but since implementing the program it now carries out 400 to 500 minor projects allowing it to free more budgets for cost-effective maintenance. The Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia in a report in 2016 called on other councils to follow Campbelltown’s approach. The project won the Local Government Excellence Award last year and the International ISSA Award for Excellence in Pavement Preservation in 2016, among other accolades.

Technologies leading to efficiencies

Another technology automating risk assessments in council assets is Black Moth, a mobile vision system that automates road defect inspections by enabling vehicles to capture detailed images and videos of the condition of roads. The technology consists of smart cameras and a vision server fitted onto a traditional road inspection vehicle that enable it to undertake an advanced road survey of risks such as potholes while it’s driving. Scott Gemmell, CEO of Black Moth, said the move towards automated technology in public infrastructure meant there was an increasing need for more efficient processes to manage council assets. “With the nature of roads and where we’re heading with automated vehicles and driverless cars, buses and other technology it will become more and more crucial that roads are serviced quickly,” he said. “Shortening that cycle between identifying a road defect and getting it repaired is crucial. Turning a reactive regime into a proactive regime is where technology can come in.” By automating road condition assessments the technology dramatically differs from traditional operator assessments. “It’s a safer, more streamlined approach that allows the operator to cover more ground on a daily basis because they’re not having to stop and assess the situation,” he said. The team is working on rolling out AI which will enable predictive analytics to predict future areas of concern based on past data, said Mr Gemmell. Another technology helping councils to improve asset management is Asset Vision, a cloud-based asset management platform to manage and report on asset and contractor performance and manage contract risk through surveillance and audits. It offers real-time notifications across web and mobile to key asset teams notified about the condition of assets, as well as in field capture of defects on site.
Related GN coverage: How councils can optimise asset management, mitigate risks
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[post_title] => Councils leveraging technology to predict asset risk [post_excerpt] => New and emerging technologies are helping councils to predict risk within infrastructure assets and improve accountability and service delivery. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => councils-leveraging-technology-to-predict-asset-risk [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-22 10:06:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-22 00:06:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30786 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30772 [post_author] => 674 [post_date] => 2018-06-18 16:10:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-18 06:10:10 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30774" align="aligncenter" width="614"] Consult Australia is urging governments to adopt its ethical procurement policy.[/caption] Major Australian engineering and design firms are calling on Australian governments to adopt a new policy for ethical and fair dealings with private contractors. The association for consulting firms in the built environment has produced a framework outlining how governments can work better with industry, as several states roll out major infrastructure agendas. Consult Australia, which represents consulting firms in the built and natural environment sectors including major firms such as Aecom, Arcadis and Aurecon, says the new principles would ensure governments behave ethically and fairly in their dealings with suppliers. The 14 principles cover a range of areas including contracts, fairness and risk allocation, working relationships, tendering, briefs and payment. “We hear a lot about industry muscle but government has muscle too, through its size, stability and tremendous purchasing power,” says CEO Megan Motto. The association argues the issue is particularly pertinent as several governments currently invest heavily in various civil and social infrastructure. While there has been a plethora of procurement reviews by Commonwealth and state governments and the Productivity Commission in recent years, successive governments have failed to address the recommendations these inquiries have consistently put forward, Ms Motto said. [caption id="attachment_30779" align="alignright" width="164"] Megan Motto[/caption] “We believe we’re at a point where our desire for infrastructure development, knowing it’s something that keeps cities liveable and drives our economy, means we have to start cutting through and embedding some of these principles for efficiency,” she told Government News. She pointed to the limited use of standard contracts currently as a key issue impacting private suppliers and contractors. “I would suggest there is well in excess of 1,000 contract forms floating around and our industry somehow has to deal with that,” she said. “Small businesses are particular affected as they don’t have in-house legal counsel to look at bespoke contracts and understand the risk allocation and obligations.” Other issues raised by suppliers were contracting out legislative provisions and setting unreasonable limits of liability, she said. “We believe these things are untenable and unreasonable, and they don’t make for a collaborative, sustainable industry.” A 2015 report by Consult Australia highlighted taxpayers could save 5.4 per cent on the cost of projects if government and industry worked better together, she said. “While we do not wish to give such feedback, its important governments are aware of what is taking place. At the moment there is a wall of silence: industry cannot talk to government through fear of being out of favour for future work,” she said. The 14 principles draw on the various recent reviews into procurement, the Commonwealth’s own “model litigant policy” and the extensive work Consult Australia has previously undertaken independently. “The key point is that if we’re looking to have more efficient infrastructure provision and more innovation in the sector then we have to do things in a different way in the future; that means we need much better partnership through the supply chain, which requires all sides to work as model parties,” said Ms Motto. Access the 14 principles here
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[post_title] => Governments must use procurement ‘muscle’ responsibly [post_excerpt] => Major Australian engineering and design firms are calling on Australian governments to adopt a new policy for ethical and fair dealings with private contractors. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => governments-must-use-procurement-muscle-responsibly [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-22 10:05:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-22 00:05:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30772 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30728 [post_author] => 675 [post_date] => 2018-06-15 11:17:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-15 01:17:30 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30745" align="aligncenter" width="700"] There are better outcomes when councils run public transport, says Graham Currie.[/caption] One of Australia’s foremost public transport experts has called for greater local government involvement in Australia’s public transport system. Professor Graham Currie, the world’s first public transport professor and director of Monash University’s Public Transport Research Group says the most successful public transport systems, both nationally and around the world, are steered by local governments. Councils need to campaign for greater involvement in public transport based on their ratepayer’s needs if Australia is to drastically improve transport networks in line with international best practice, he argues.  “There is a particularly Australian flavour to the problems we have in this country,” Professor Currie told Government News. [caption id="attachment_30736" align="alignright" width="141"] Professor Graham Currie[/caption] “We have a very strong central government, our states have all revolved around big cities and as a result we’ve had less local government involvement in public transport provision. That’s quite unusual internationally - France, the United States even, have much more local government involvement,” he said. Professor Currie said that where local governments in Australia have had greater power, they have had markedly differently outcomes. He points to Brisbane, where one of the largest bus fleets in Australia is run by local government. “It’s one of best in the world and we have a local government running it,” said Professor Currie, who has published more papers in leading academic journals on public transport than any other researcher. “Whenever we have local government involvement in running, managing, funding we get better outcomes,” he said. The Gold Coast’s light rail and the Canberra and Darwin public transport systems are other examples where “local government involvement has been much more successful with public transport,” Professor Currie said. “Councils should be doing facilitation, which means campaigning and working with other local governments to bring about change. Councils can do things better by encouraging better design and running transport systems themselves,” he said.

Urban sprawl a key issue

Urban sprawl operates as the greatest impediment to an efficient public transport system in Australia’s capital cities, according to Professor Currie. European-style high density inner areas and urban sprawl on the fringe is the “new dynamic” in Australia, which is creating a need for better public transport services, he said.   Addressing urban sprawl through better planning controls could help to ameliorate the problem. “We could do it with planning by having constraints on boundaries of cities and encouraging high-density development,” he said.

Funding model flawed

Professor Currie argues that state governments need to review the current public transport funding models, saying a reliance on fuel taxes to fund road maintenance is problematic as the road system is increasingly electrified.    “There are international funding models around which will help solve the problem and many cities now are pricing use of transport in congested cities.” As Government News reported last week, the City of Melbourne is currently exploring long-term options to meet unprecedented demand for public transport.
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[post_title] => Local government key to tackling public transport woes: expert [post_excerpt] => One of Australia’s foremost public transport experts has called for greater local government involvement in Australia’s public transport system. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => local-government-key-to-tackling-public-transport-woes-expert [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-19 08:54:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-18 22:54:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30728 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30678 [post_author] => 655 [post_date] => 2018-06-12 10:54:45 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-12 00:54:45 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30682" align="aligncenter" width="687"] The Craft Your Park project engaged various community groups in the design.[/caption] A project that engaged various community stakeholders in the design of a new park is among the public works that have been recognised for innovation and leadership. Design studio Spacelab was recognised by the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects ACT Chapter on Thursday for its ‘Craft your Park initiative in Finn Street, O’Connor for listening to the community and translating their feedback into the design. “The design process involved an open dialogue, woven with local stories and histories from kindergarten children to landcare groups and the local community, where the design team were the ‘editors’ and the community the ‘authors’ of the new design,” the judges said. The awards recognised 10 projects in landscape architecture in categories ranging from parks and play spaces to infrastructure and cultural heritage. “There are a number of projects from this year’s awards program that demonstrate the community and environmental benefits that come from proper community engagement and consultation, planning for green infrastructure and involve landscape architects leading quality design projects at the early stages,” the institute’s ACT president Gay Williamson said.

Changing streetscapes

The award of excellence in civic landscape was jointly awarded to Jane Irwin Landscape Architecture, the National Capital Authority, Hill Thalis, SMEC and AECOM for the first stage of the transformation of Constitution Avenue. In this major public space enhancement project, Constitution Avenue has been transformed into a series of pedestrian friendly streetscapes changing in character from ceremonial to civic to urban to bushland, in response to surrounding landscapes.  [caption id="attachment_30679" align="alignnone" width="659"] Constitution Avenue now has a series of pedestrian friendly streetscapes.[/caption]

Parks and open spaces

A successful mix of landscape and utility to encourage community interaction in open space in Moncrieff East, a new suburban estate in north Canberra, was recognised in the award's parks and open space category. Redbox Design Group was recognised for leading the works on the multi-purpose community recreation park. [caption id="attachment_30684" align="alignnone" width="650"] Moncrieff East was recognised in the parks and open space category.[/caption]

Play spaces

Redbox Design Group was also recognised for its work on the Moncrieff Community Recreation Park, a space designed to meet the needs of the community by integrating a range of exercise, play and ball sport areas.  [caption id="attachment_30685" align="alignnone" width="655"] The community recreation park in Moncrieff integrates a range of areas.[/caption]
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[post_title] => Cutting-edge parks, open spaces celebrated [post_excerpt] => A project that engaged various community stakeholders in the design of a new park is among the public works that have been recognised for innovation and leadership. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => cutting-edge-parks-open-spaces-celebrated [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-12 10:54:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-12 00:54:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30678 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30650 [post_author] => 675 [post_date] => 2018-06-12 09:42:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-11 23:42:49 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30653" align="aligncenter" width="581"] Investment in regional Victoria's rail is critical, groups say.[/caption] Infrastructure executives say more investment in rail in regional Victoria is needed to help tackle Melbourne’s unprecedented urban growth. Their call comes as the Federal and Victorian governments announced that work has progressed on a four-year $1.75 billion program to upgrade all regional rail lines in Victoria.   Peter Tesdorpf, executive at Rail Futures, said that greater investment in rail infrastructure in regional areas is critical to rebalance population growth in Melbourne CBD, which is causing a “dysfunctional” public transport system. “We can't survive as a city without serious investment in rail in Melbourne and regional Victoria,” he told MAV’s Infrastructure and Asset Management Conference on Friday. There is a “complete disconnect” between land use planning and transport planning which is at the core of the problem, said Mr Tepsdorf.

A European rail network

Australia needs to invest in a more European-style public transport system in which separate rail lines connect central areas of Victoria with regional and rural areas, said Mr Tepsdorf.  “If we can open up regional Victoria through better rail services then that opens up better housing opportunities and it’s good for tourism and business investment.” John Hearsch, president at Rail Futures, said that while there has been “significant investment” in the regional rail system in Victoria over the last decade, more is needed. “Rail infrastructure is a long-term game. It has a life of 100 years or more, so even though it costs several billions to construct, it’s going to be there for a long time,” he said. Mr Hearsch says trains between the CBD and regional areas need to be segregated with new tracks in order to maximise efficiency and effectiveness. “We do have separation between city and Sunshine but that segregation will have to go considerably further in the not too distant future,” he said. However, while investments in rail are welcome, Glenelg Shire Council asset management coordinator Ricky Luke said they would have minimal benefit for regional councils like his which are heavily reliant on roads for transport. “In the long run, any improvement to trains will have some benefit to us but in the short to medium term the priority is to get more funding and improvements of our roads,” he said.

State’s rail plans make progress

Meanwhile, federal Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Michael McCormack and Victorian Minister for Public Transport Jacinta Allan on Friday announced that work had progresses on plans to improve regional rail networks. The program includes $80 million to duplicate track and other upgrades around Waurn Ponds Station. These works are part of the $160 million Geelong Line Upgrade, as well as a Ballarat Line Upgrade, Warrnambool, Gippsland and Bendigo Echuca line upgrade, all due by 2022. The benefits of these works will begin to flow as early as later this year, said Ms Allan.
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[post_title] => Regional rail key to decentralised growth [post_excerpt] => Infrastructure executives say more investment in rail in regional Victoria is needed to help tackle Melbourne’s unprecedented urban growth. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => regional-rail-key-to-decentralised-growth [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-12 10:55:55 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-12 00:55:55 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30650 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30645 [post_author] => 675 [post_date] => 2018-06-12 09:41:50 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-11 23:41:50 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_29770" align="aligncenter" width="632"] New technology is helping councils manage their assets.[/caption] Software that forecasts infrastructure deterioration and data analysis that reviews processes are among the tools helping local governments to improve asset management. The City of Tea Tree Gully in South Australia has transformed its asset management processes through a new award-winning strategy that improved service delivery, risk management and investment. Ben Clark, assets business administrator at Tea Tree Gully, says the program had significantly improved asset management. “We have seen an increase in efficiencies in most teams. We were able to streamline processes and maintain assets quicker, respond to customers quicker and provide a better product,” he told Government News. [caption id="attachment_30647" align="alignright" width="161"] Ben Clark[/caption] Managing $1.4 billion in assets and spending 85 per cent of its capital program on the development and management of assets, the council realised it had to improve the way it managed infrastructure in order to maximise investment and minimise risk.   To do that, the council implemented the managing assets through capability and knowledge (MACK) project, which reviewed its asset management processes to adopt best practice. It used the IPWEA National Asset Management Strategy template to undertake a maturity assessment of its asset management practices. Under the MACK project, which was overseen by a steering group, the council undertook an IT review and ultimately invested in improved solutions. This included the introduction of tablets to field staff with an asset management software in which customer requests are passed directly to customer service and then onto relevant teams. Mr Clark said that the introduction of tablets to field staff, which was completed after an extensive procurement process, was key to the program’s success. “It enables field staff to capture data, receive all their work on tablets, know what they need before they go out there so they can make sure they have the necessary equipment," he told Government News on the sidelines of the event.  With 83 per cent of customer requests relating to acquisition and maintenance of assets in 2012-13, customer service delivery was critical, he said. Mr Clark says the council will soon introduce a customer system that enables better communication with ratepayers by providing work updates through texts and emails. Last week, Tea Tree Gully’s program won an award for excellence in asset management projects and practice from the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia SA.

Software to detect asset deterioration

Another technology that’s helping councils to optimise asset management and mitigate asset risks is the CAMS asset management software, developed by RMIT University. [caption id="attachment_30648" align="alignright" width="157"] Sujeeva Setunge[/caption] CAMS is a cloud-based asset management and deterioration prediction software that captures data on assets and assessments of deterioration so councils can prioritise repair and renewal works. The software includes CAMS Mobile, an application that allows asset managers to collect and upload condition data to CAMS Online, where the data can be reviewed and committed after approval. Professor Sujeeva Setunge, deputy dean of research at RMIT, told the Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) Infrastructure and Asset Management Conference last week that the technology enables councils to optimise investment by predicting failure. “CAMS enables a risk profile to be established and prevents backlog,” she said.

Data crucial to mitigate risks

Elsewhere, Martin Schroder, change agent and former digital transformation officer at Ballarat City Council, told the MAV conference that utilising data to review and improve business practices is a key way to mitigate risk and effectively manage assets. “Data is an essential component to understand and design better business practices,” he said. “If we fix our business practice, that leads to better data.” Mr Schroder said that councils need to “use risk management as your weapon, risk is your friend.”

Integration key to optimising assets

Sam Ortisi, manager of strategic asset management at Maribbyrnong City Council, said that reviewing and integrating maintenance programs to ensure they prolong an asset's life is critical. “If you’re creating an asset you want to make sure your maintenance programs prolong its life because, if maintenance strategies meet the requirements, you’ll see the rate of wear won’t vary from what designers tell us,” he said.
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[post_title] => How councils can optimise asset management, mitigate risks [post_excerpt] => Software that forecasts infrastructure deterioration and data analysis that reviews processes are among the tools helping local governments to improve asset management. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-councils-can-optimise-asset-management-mitigate-risks [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-15 12:09:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-15 02:09:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30645 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30635 [post_author] => 675 [post_date] => 2018-06-08 09:05:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-07 23:05:11 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30637" align="aligncenter" width="647"] Driverless cars could see revenue reductions for councils, advisor says. [/caption] Local governments need to prepare for the infrastructure challenges associated with the advent of driverless vehicles, such as new costs and a hit to revenue, an infrastructure advisor says. The director of automated vehicle infrastructure at Infrastructure Victoria, Dr Allison Stewart, has called on all councils to consider the potential impact of driverless vehicles. “This really could be one of the most fundamental changes in transport over the coming years,” she told MAV’s Infrastructure and Asset Management Conference in Melbourne on Thursday. “The most important thing for councils, first of all, is to understand research looking at how this could change the future for them.” Dr Stewart told Government News that councils need to stay informed of the technology and consider the potential impact of driverless vehicles on their budgets - an issue she says could be a “huge concern” for many local governments.   [caption id="attachment_30636" align="alignright" width="137"] Dr Allison Stewart[/caption] Councils must consider the financial implications of maintaining and renewing assets like roads during the rollout of driverless and zero-emissions vehicles, said Dr Stewart. Forecasting the potential impact of the cars on council budgets includes “trying to identify potential infrastructure costs in the short and long term as we see potentially a significant proportion of vehicle space on the roads,” she said. “The worst thing that could happen is if you’re caught off guard with this technology at this level of change.”

A hit to revenue

Dr Stewart warned that driverless cars could result in revenue reductions for councils if patterns of transport among residents change and there is a widespread uptake of self-parking driverless vehicles. “We might see less parking depending on whether people decide to send their private autonomous vehicles home to park during the day. That could potentially have significant impacts for revenue sources,” she said. Dr Stewart’s remarks come as the National Transport Commissions delivers a reform roadmap to prepare Australia’s roads for more automated vehicles that could see them operating “safely and legally” on our roads before 2020.  

Key concerns for councils

Infrastructure Victoria recently engaged stakeholders as part of formulating advice for the Victorian Government on the infrastructure required to support driverless vehicles. Dr Stewart said local governments highlighted a lack of awareness around the potential impact of automated vehicles on councils as well as concern around the economic impacts on them. Last month, Infrastructure Victoria released a consultation summary revealing stakeholders’ main concerns, which included impacts on land use patterns, energy supply and charging capacity, public acceptance and government policy and infrastructure implications. The paper noted that although many stakeholders felt government needed to play a role in the ownership of energy infrastructure, there was significant concern around the level of responsibility for infrastructure planning for driverless vehicles. “There is uncertainty around who is responsible for meeting the infrastructure needs of future vehicles, given responsibility for roads is shared between local and state governments,” the summary said. It also noted stakeholder’s concern about the interaction between automated vehicles and road infrastructure, including lane sizes, line markings and lights, congestion, public transport and the need for new infrastructure.

Report forecasts scenarios

Infrastructure Victoria in April released a report that outlined a series of future scenarios resulting from the rollout of driverless vehicles on infrastructure. Infrastructure Victoria will release a further report in August and its final advice to government in October outlining the potential infrastructure that would be required for each of the future scenarios. Dr Stewart said this report will have “significant findings” for local and state government.
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[post_title] => Call for councils to consider automated cars [post_excerpt] => Local governments need to prepare for the infrastructure challenges associated with the advent of driverless vehicles, such as new costs and a hit to revenue, an infrastructure advisor says. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => call-for-councils-to-consider-automated-cars [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-08 09:13:08 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-07 23:13:08 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30635 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30620 [post_author] => 674 [post_date] => 2018-06-08 08:36:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-07 22:36:41 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30623" align="aligncenter" width="647"] Heatwaves injure and kill more people in Sydney than any other shock event: assessment. [/caption] Heatwaves pose the greatest threat to Sydney, followed by storms and bushfires, according to an international benchmark of cities’ capacity to handle shocks and stresses. Infrastructure failure, the collapse of financial institutions, terrorist attacks and digital network failures are all identified as potential “acute shocks” facing Sydney but its heat that presents the greatest threat to Australia’s most populous city, according to a new assessment. Since 2015 Sydney and Melbourne have been leading local governments, businesses and community groups in the development of a resiliency strategy for their cities, through their involvement in the 100 Resilient Cities initiative. The Rockefeller Foundation-backed resiliency program helps cities develop and implement strategies to survive and recover from key contemporary challenges such as urbanisation and climate change. Beck Dawson, chief resilience officer with City of Sydney, told the Local Government Professionals NSW conference on Wednesday that the risk assessment identified heat as Sydney’s greatest potential shock yet few governments had emergency responses in place. “More people end up in hospital and more people die as a result of extreme heat in Sydney than any other shock event that we’ve had to date,” she told the Sydney audience. The assessment drew on the World Economic Forum’s risk list, a review of 50 past shock events in Australia and New Zealand, and the key incidents that occurred in the 25 South East Asian cities participating in the program, she said. It was also informed by community consultation across Sydney in which communities nominated their chief concerns. While Sydney has a diverse population – with 39 per cent of adults in the city born in another country – there was “huge commonality” across the different regions in terms of what citizens were concerned about. “We were expecting lots of diversity in the views during the different workshops, but when it came to being safe, to talking about the things we valued, the priorities were the same across the city,” Ms Dawson said.

Vulnerabilities: health a key stress

Aside from sudden shocks, the risk assessment also identified Sydney’s key stresses – the slow burning, long-term issues that can cause major harm if left unaddressed. Health issues, in particular chronic disease, topped that list, as they added pressure to an already stretched health system and left the city vulnerable to shocks such as a heatwave, Ms Dawson said. “In Sydney, more than half of adults today are overweight and obese. On top of that, one in four will have mental health issues in their lifetime which will impact their workplaces, family and friends.” Drug and alcohol is the biggest driver of police time across the city and has an ongoing impact on family violence, she added. Social cohesion was nominated as an issue of concern by the community, yet it did not rate in conversations with government and the private sector, Ms Dawson said.

Strategy: social cohesion, preparedness

The risk analysis had guided conversations among the 33 councils and the state government agencies involved in the project about the allocation of resources against key risks, as well as the roles and responsibilities of stakeholders, she said. The city’s resilience strategy, which has been more than two years in development, is being finalised for a July release and will outline five directions for action. To boost community preparedness, the project will aim to encourage 100,000 Sydney residents to download and use a new Red Cross app, Get Prepared. It’s also looking at economic resilience assessments for key CBDs, which would involve eight local governments, and working to maximise governments’ various social cohesion programs given the importance of community in responding to disasters. “The more connected a community is before a disaster, the better they respond and recover. It’s the single most important protective measure,” Ms Dawson said. Given private corporations deliver many of the large city systems in Sydney, the project is also seeking to work with 100 businesses on how they manage shocks and stresses, she said. Read more on Sydney's resilient city strategy 
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[post_title] => New framework guides governments on risks [post_excerpt] => Heatwaves pose the greatest threat to Sydney, followed by storms and bushfires, according to an international benchmark of cities’ capacity to handle shocks and stresses. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => new-framework-guides-governments-on-risks [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-12 10:56:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-12 00:56:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30620 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30594 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2018-06-05 10:32:10 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-05 00:32:10 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30596" align="aligncenter" width="636"] Many large cities face the twin challenges of ageing infrastructure and increased volumes of people.[/caption] Cities are expanding upwards and downwards, as well as outwards. With urban density also increasing, moving people efficiently around the city, often using ageing infrastructure, is quite a challenge, write Andrea Connor and Donald McNeill. Cities worldwide face the problems and possibilities of “volume”: the stacking and moving of people and things within booming central business districts. We see this especially around mass public transport hubs. As cities grow, they also become more vertical. They are expanding underground through rail corridors and above ground into the tall buildings that shape city skylines. Cities are deep as well as wide. The urban geographer Stephen Graham describes cities as both “vertically stacked” and “vertically sprawled”, laced together by vertical and horizontal transport systems. People flow in large cities is not only about how people move horizontally on rail and road networks into and out of city centres. It also includes vertical transport systems. These are the elevators, escalators and moving sidewalks that commuters use every day to get from the underground to the surface street level. Major transport hubs are where many vertical and horizontal transport systems converge. It’s here that people flows are most dense. But many large cities face the twin challenges of ageing infrastructure and increased volumes of people flowing through transport hubs. Problems of congestion, overcrowding, delays and even lockouts are becoming more common. Governments are increasingly looking for ways to squeeze more capacity out of existing infrastructure networks.

Can we increase capacity by changing behaviour?

For the last three years, Transport for London (TfL) has been running standing-only escalator trials. The aim is to see if changing commuter behaviour might increase “throughput” of people and reduce delays. London has some of the deepest underground stations in the world. This means the Tube system is heavily reliant on vertical transport such as escalators. But a long-standing convention means people only stand on the right side and allow others to walk up on the left. In a trial at Holborn Station, one of London’s deepest at 23 metres, commuters were asked to stand on both sides during morning rush hour. The results of the trials showed that changing commuter behaviour could improve throughput by increasing capacity by as much as 30% at peak times. But this works only in Tube stations with very tall escalators. At stations with escalators less than 18 metres high, like Canary Wharf, the trials found the opposite – standing would only increase congestion across the network. [caption id="" align="alignnone" width="640"] By standing only, 30% more people could fit on an escalator in the trial at Holborn Station.[/caption] The difference is down to human behaviour. People are simply less willing to walk up very tall escalators. This means a standing-only policy across the network won’t improve people flow uniformly and could even make congestion worse.

Is people movement data a solution?

With the introduction of ticketless transport cards it’s now possible to gather more data about people flow through busy transport hubs as we tap on and off. Tracking commuters’ in-station journeys through their Wi-Fi enabled devices, such as smart phones, can also offer a detailed picture of movement between platforms, congestion and delays. Transport for London has already conducted its first Wi-Fi tracking trial in the London Underground. Issues of privacy loom large in harvesting mobile data from individual devices. Still, there’s enormous potential to use this data to resolve issues of overcrowding and inform commuters about delays and congestion en route. Governments are also increasingly turning to consultancy firms that specialise in simulation modelling of people flow. That’s everything from check-in queues and processing at terminals, to route tracking and passenger flow on escalators. Using data analytics, people movement specialists identify movement patterns, count footfall and analyse commuter behaviour. In existing infrastructure, they look to achieve “efficiencies” through changes to scheduling and routing, and assessing the directional flow of commuters. Construction and engineering companies are also beginning to employ people movement specialists during the design phase of large infrastructure projects. Beijing’s Daxing airport, due for completion in 2020, will be the largest transport hub in China. It’s also the first major infrastructure project to use crowd simulation and analysis software during the design process to test anticipated volume against capacity. The advice of people movement specialists can have significant impacts on physical infrastructure. This involves aspects such as the width of platforms, number and placement of gates, and the layout and positioning of vertical transport, such as escalators.

Movement analytics is becoming big business

People movement analytics is becoming big business, especially where financialisation of public assets is increasing. This means infrastructure is being developed through complex public-private partnership models. As a result, transport hubs are now also commercial spaces for retail, leisure and business activities. Commuters are no longer only in transit when they make their way through these spaces. They are potential consumers as they move through the retail concourse in many of these developments. In an era of “digital disruption”, which is particularly affecting the retail sector, information about commuter mobility has potential commercial value. The application of data analytics to people flow and its use by the people movement industry to achieve “efficiencies” needs careful scrutiny to ensure benefits beyond commercial gain. The ConversationAt the same time, mobility data may well help our increasingly vertical cities to keep flowing up, down and across.
Andrea Connor is a postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute for Culture and Society, Western Sydney University and Donald McNeill is a professor of urban and cultural geography at Western Sydney University.This article was originally published on The Conversation
[post_title] => Growing cities face challenges of keeping the masses moving  [post_excerpt] => Cities are expanding upwards and downwards, as well as outwards. With urban density also increasing, moving people efficiently around the city, often using ageing infrastructure, is quite a challenge, write Andrea Connor and Donald McNeill. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => growing-cities-face-challenges-of-keeping-the-masses-moving [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-05 11:20:21 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-05 01:20:21 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30594 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30570 [post_author] => 675 [post_date] => 2018-06-05 10:20:07 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-05 00:20:07 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30571" align="aligncenter" width="664"] NSW's trial aims to reduce truck stops at lights, easing delays for all motorists.[/caption] In a bid to tackle growing congestion, the NSW Government is introducing technology that will soon see trucks interact with traffic lights to gain priority on key freight routes. A three-month trial of the technology, which got underway on Sunday, could reduce the number of times trucks stop at traffic lights, potentially easing delays for all motorists.  The pilot, involving 100 trucks and 40 kilometres of freight routes, marks the first time that wireless connected vehicle technology using DSRC, or dedicated short range communication, is being trialled on NSW roads. Oncoming participating heavy vehicles will send signals to traffic lights on freight routes in Pennant Hills, Parramatta and King Georges, which will delay an orange and red light for trucks to allow them through. During the trial, the government will track vehicle travel time, speed, time to stop and start, fuel consumption and emission estimates, with the results evaluated to determine effects on congestion. Minister for Roads, Maritime and Freight Melinda Pavey said the technology is an efficient means of targeting congestion, given the likelihood of delays caused by trucks. “Heavy vehicles take a long time to stop and start, which can cause delays for all road users,” Ms Pavey said. “This trial will detect a heavy vehicle approaching traffic lights and provide more green time, which will hopefully show us how we can ease delays for all motorists.” WATCH: Click on image to see NSW's freight signal priority trial:   The trial follows an existing connected vehicle system that grants priority to late-running buses in Sydney. Ms Pavey said the government hopes the technology could be ultimately used with emergency vehicles and buses.
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[post_title] => New technology sees trucks 'talk' to traffic lights [post_excerpt] => In a bid to tackle growing congestion, the NSW Government is introducing technology that will soon see trucks interact with traffic lights to gain priority on key freight routes. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => new-technology-sees-trucks-talk-to-traffic-lights [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-05 10:33:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-05 00:33:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30570 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30488 [post_author] => 675 [post_date] => 2018-05-29 08:15:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-28 22:15:02 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30489" align="aligncenter" width="617"] Governments underestimate how much regulation disrupts investment, says Dean Dalla Valle.[/caption] Industry calls on government to encourage private freight investment by streamlining regulation and to make greater use of rail. The head of one of Australia’s largest rail freight businesses has said the Australian Government needs to arrest a year-on-year drop in infrastructure investment by slashing unnecessary red tape. CEO of Pacific National Dean Dalla Valle told a CEDA event on Friday that governments often “underestimate how disruptive poorly designed regulations can be,” adding that investment would “only flow where there is political certainty.” Citing Infrastructure Partnerships Australia analysis that found 62 per cent of investors identified “political risks” in freight, Mr Dalla Valle said the Commonwealth can support private investment through “simplified, harmonised regulation”. “The heart of the issue involves government and industry partnering to enable the safest and most productive supply chains through a harmonised approach to rail regulation,” he said. Clare Gardiner-Barnes, NSW’s deputy-secretary for freight, told the Sydney audience that the State Government is looking to amend its regulations and legislation to reduce bureaucracy and increase flexibility. She said the NSW Freight and Ports Plan, which is set for release later this year, will provide greater certainty to industry and support investment.             A coordinated intergovernmental approach and improved partnerships with industry are critical to support the growing freight task, she said.

Call for ‘rail renaissance’

Both Mr Dalla Valle and Ms Gardiner-Barnes pointed to Australia’s road-dominated approach to freight as a key supply chain issue. Mr Dalla Valle deemed the volume of trucks dominating Australian freight as “unsustainable”, pointing to traffic congestion, emissions and the high number of heavy vehicle fatalities. “Our major motorways and highways are at risk of becoming a conveyor belt of trucks,” he said. Rail is safer and reduces congestion and emissions, he argued, pointing to a Deloitte report which found a typical freight train can take 65 trucks off the road and produces 16 times less pollution. Although the shift towards rail was starting to gain traction within the government’s infrastructure pipeline, Mr Dalla Valle said more progress is needed. Ms Gardiner-Barnes said the NSW Government is “committed” to working with industry to increase the rail freight share by 28 per cent by 2021.

COAG agrees framework

Earlier this month the Council of Australian Governments agreed a framework for developing a 20-year national Freight and Supply Chain Strategy, which transport ministers say builds on the findings of the report of the Inquiry into National Freight and Supply Chain Priorities. That report, which was released on 18 May, advocated a coordinated national approach by all levels of government in order to meet freight demand, which is forecast to triple by 2050. Local government peak bodies have been calling for more coordination with councils on freight strategy and infrastructure. David O’Loughlin, president of the Australian Local Government Association said his peak will be collaborating with the Commonwealth and states on the National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy to ensure the role of local government is supported.        
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[post_title] => Freight investment turns on government regulation: CEO  [post_excerpt] => Industry calls on government to encourage private freight investment by streamlining regulation and to make greater use of rail. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => freight-investment-turns-on-government-regulation-ceo [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-01 10:10:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-01 00:10:59 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30488 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30321 [post_author] => 674 [post_date] => 2018-05-18 09:16:48 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-17 23:16:48 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_29348" align="aligncenter" width="584"] Liveability targets: Perth is creating more walkable streets but lagging behind on dwelling density. [/caption] Consistent, evidence-based policies across state and local governments are essential to creating healthy communities, new research shows. A new evaluation of the progress to improve liveability in Perth has highlighted the importance of targets for key domains as well as integrated planning across government departments and agencies. The report by researchers at the University of Western Australia, RMIT University and Australian Catholic University builds on last year’s measure of liveability in Australia’s capital cities. It found that while Perth had made progress in some areas, including walkability and access to bigger parks, it was lagging behind in others. Perth is doing well in creating smaller, walkable streets and providing access to larger neighbourhood parks within 400 meters of residences. But it’s lagging behind on dwelling density and proving access to activity centres, the report found. The city is achieving its transport target – that 60 per cent of residents should be within 400 metres of a bus stop of 800 meters of train stop – but the researchers note the policy is “modest” compared to other state capital cities. The report found: 
“Although Perth is creating some walkable communities on the urban fringe, many of these communities are not ‘liveable’ because they lack access to transport, employment and infrastructure."
The research team recommends that the Western Australian Government undertake “evidence-informed integrated transport, land use and infrastructure planning” and create walkable neighbourhoods as a foundation of a liveable city. The government should also set targets for all seven urban liveability domains, including short, medium and long-term goals, the researchers said. The report also highlighted the importance of ensuring state and local government policies are “consistent, based on evidence and designed to create healthy, liveable communities.”

Report at a glance 

Walkability: 71% of residential streets in Perth meet length and width targets for walkability. Reflecting a common pattern in Australian cities, walkability in Perth is best in inner-city areas and declines towards the urban fringe Public transport: 64% of residents in Perth achieve nearby access to public transport.  Public open space: 78% of residents in Perth are withing 400 metres of a public open space of any size, behind Melbourne and Sydney (82%) but ahead of City of Brisbane (75%).  Housing affordability: Like most other cities, Perth's housing affordability declined between 2011 and 2016. Some 38% of lower-income households in Perth are experiencing housing affordability stress.  Employment: 31% of employed people live and work in their broader local area, high than in Melbourne (28%) and Brisbane (27%). 
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[post_title] => Integrated planning key to liveable cities: report  [post_excerpt] => Consistent, evidence-based policies across state and local governments are essential to creating healthy communities, new research shows. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => integrated-planning-key-to-liveable-cities-report [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-05-18 10:44:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-05-18 00:44:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30321 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30243 [post_author] => 674 [post_date] => 2018-05-11 09:08:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-05-10 23:08:28 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30245" align="aligncenter" width="650"] More than 80% of the budget's transport spending is on roads, analyst says.[/caption] The Commonwealth should link its budget's infrastructure investment to its innovation agenda to ensure new technologies are used to reduce construction and maintenance costs, analysts say. Given the budget’s injection of $24.5 billion for major roads and rail infrastructure, the private sector and universities should work closely with federal and state governments to ensure the skilled workforce required to deliver the landmark projects can be trained locally. That’s according to Dr Behzad Fatahi, an associate professor of civil engineering at The University of Technology Sydney who said the new funding should be tied to the government’s innovation agenda. [caption id="attachment_30249" align="alignright" width="110"] Behzad Fatahi[/caption] “Federal government should try to link the national innovation and science agenda with these new infrastructure investments to ensure smart ideas and new technologies will be proposed and used to reduce the construction and maintenance cost of transport infrastructure, to ensure projects are viable,” Dr Fatahi said. Smarter, more efficient ways of constructing and maintaining large-scale infrastructure is needed given maintenance cost of transport infrastructure has been increasing, he said. “For example, over the past five years, the expenditure for local road maintenance has increased by $97 million.” At the same time disruption to infrastructure systems can cause tremendous challenges for society, such as a significant reduction in the freight capacity of roads and railway lines and delayed commuter access to ports, airports, industrial areas and business precincts, he said. “Therefore, Australian industries together with research organisations should focus their research and development efforts on developing efficient construction technologies to reduce future maintenance cost of transport infrastructure, so the return on investment on the upcoming projects could enhance," Dr Fatahi said.

Spend on roads

While the budget funding for rail projects is welcome, it does not go nearly far enough to meet the challenges facing the country, especially the cities where most Australians live, according to Dr Ian Woodcock from the Centre for Urban Research at RMIT University. He said: 
"Roads represent about 84 per cent of the transport project funding, far more should be going to rail where we are playing catch up for an advanced economy.”
A funding program for comprehensive, integrated transport planning is needed more than support for project-based business cases for politically-driven road projects, he said. "The ‘up to $5 billion’ for airport rail for Victoria comes with strings attached that may re-ignite the political differences that have stalled this link for several decades," Dr Ian Woodcock said. 

Key projects

Budget papers show that the key rail infrastructure projects among the $24.5 billion of new funding include:
  • up to $5 billion for construction of a rail link to the Melbourne Airport
  • $1.1 billion towards further components of Perth's METRONET program
  • $400 million to duplicate a section of the Port Botany Rail Line
  • $390 million for the upgrade of the Beerburrum to Nambour Line on the Sunshine Coast
  • $300 million for the Brisbane Metro project
  • $220 million for the electrification of the Gawler Line in northern Adelaide.
The major urban and regional road projects include:
  • $1 billion for the M1 Motorway corridor
  • $3.3 billion for the Bruce Highway in Queensland
  • $1.4 billion for Adelaide's North–South Corridor
  • $971 million to build the Coffs Harbour Bypass on the Pacific Highway in NSW
  • $1.75 billion for the new North East Link in Melbourne
  • $560 million to deliver Stages 2 and 3 of the Bunbury Outer Ring Road in WA
  • $280 million for regional road works in the NT
  • $461 million to build a new Bridgewater Bridge in Hobart.
Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Michael McCormack said that strong governance arrangements linked to funding commitments would ensure value for money on the projects while the Commonwealth would “continue to press the states and territories to provide their fair share of funding”. “The government also remains committed to exploring every opportunity for private sector involvement to help reduce the cost on hard-working Australians,” he said.

Industry reaction 

Denita Wawn, CEO of Master Builders Australia, welcomed the budget's infrastructure spend. "The additional $24 billion investment in infrastructure across the country will boost the productivity and liveability of our cities,” she said The Green Building Council of Australia said the Federal Government must continue to make "future-focused infrastructure investments" to ensure the livability of towns, cities and communities remain livable. Jonathan Cartledge, the council's head of public affairs, said the attention on urban congestion hot spots backed by $1 billion in funding is welcome and should be part of a broader strategy to support better urban design outcomes.
Related GN budget coverage:
[post_title] => Budget: transport infrastructure spend needs 'smart ideas' [post_excerpt] => The Commonwealth should link its budget's infrastructure investment to its innovation agenda to ensure new technologies are used to reduce construction and maintenance costs, analysts say. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => budget-transport-infrastructure-spend-needs-smart-ideas [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-05-11 10:50:41 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-05-11 00:50:41 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30243 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 14 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 30804 [post_author] => 655 [post_date] => 2018-06-19 08:48:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-06-18 22:48:13 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_30670" align="aligncenter" width="658"] Health, education and infrastructure are big ticket items in NSW's 2018 budget.[/caption] Assertive outreach services and a new social impact investment are among the elements of a $1 billion homelessness package to be included in NSW’s budget today. Tailored support will be provided to rough sleepers, young people and victims of domestic violence under the package. The program includes $20 million over four years to a social impact investment on homelessness to tap into the expertise of the private and not-for-profit sector. It will provide for more assertive outreach services for rough sleepers, strengthened risk assessment to address individuals’ circumstances and enhanced support to maintain a tenancy. Included in the program is $9.1 million for additional transitional accommodation, $6.9 million on co-located homeless and health services and $6.2 million to expand the Staying Home Leaving Violence program to five new sites. The NSW Government’s budget will also contain $1 billion in new recurrent health funding to employ an extra 1370 workers, including 950 nurses and midwives, 300 doctors and 120 allied health professions. The State Government says that brings the budget’s total health spend to $23 billion. In education, the government will announce “the largest investment into schools by any state government in history” with funding of $6 billion over four years to deliver more than 170 new and upgraded schools. The budget contains funding for an extra 20 new and upgraded schools, the planning for which will begin this year. Work will commence on 40 new and upgraded school projects this year. In transport, the budget will outline a $1.5 billion investment in bus services throughout the state, which will see more than 2,000 extra bus services rolled out in the next 12 months. The number of trains running in the morning and afternoon peaks on the T4 and T8 lines will be increased with an $880 million investment in technology to modernise the Sydney Trains network. The key southern Sydney route Heathcote Road will get a $173 million package to improve safety and traffic flow, while $40 million will be spent sealing the last stretch of the Cobb and Silver City highways, meaning every major highway in the state will now be sealed. In resources, the budget will also contain $23 million for the recently established Natural Resources Access Regulators to increase water compliance and enforcement. The Australia Museum will undergo a $50 million refurbishment before it hosts Tutankhamun: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh, the largest Tutankhamun exhibition to ever leave Egypt, for a six-month run in early 2021.
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[post_title] => Boost for health workforce, homeless services in NSW budget [post_excerpt] => Assertive outreach services and a new social impact investment are among the elements of a $1 billion homelessness package to be included in NSW’s budget today. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => boost-for-health-workforce-homeless-services-in-nsw-budget [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2018-06-19 08:48:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2018-06-18 22:48:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=30804 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 531 [max_num_pages] => 38 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => 1 [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 7f9b00e4326f0dde45fa1e3e01e4a903 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

Infrastructure