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                    [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_27755" align="alignnone" width="287"] 
Cr Jennifer Alden, Craig Lloyd and Cr Andrea Metcalf (L-R).[/caption] Recent audits of local waste and recycling bins have shown that Greater Bendigo residents are still sending significant amounts of recyclables straight to landfill by placing many items that could be recycled into their waste bins. In an effort to improve recycling rates, the City of Greater Bendigo has launched a new community education Sort it out before you throw it out! advertising campaign. The campaign will provide useful information about the items that residents are currently not recycling to make them aware that they can. It will utilise television, radio, print, social media and signage to encourage residents to think about and improve the way they sort their waste, organics and recycling. City of Greater Bendigo Presentation and Assets director Craig Lloyd said the City’s recent waste bin audits showed that 40% of the contents of local waste bins should have been placed in the recycling bin while 22 per cent could have gone in the organics bin. “The audit is backed up by State Government figures that place Greater Bendigo in the bottom 50 per cent of Victoria’s 79 local government areas for waste resource recovery,” said Mr Lloyd. “Unfortunately, many Greater Bendigo residents are still placing recyclables such as paper and cardboard, glass bottles and jars, cans, plastics and organic garden and food waste in their red lid waste bin. “Objects that can be recycled are a valuable resource and the cost of sending waste to landfill will continue to rise so the more we recycle and the less we send to landfill the better. “Greater Bendigo wants to become one of, if not the best, local government area for resource recovery in the future. “Many people may be surprised to learn that Greater Bendigo residents are not very good at recycling and we want to see this change for the better in the near future.” Results from the audit:-
  • The average residential red lid waste bin contains 40% recyclable items, 22% organics and 38% actual waste.
  • The recyclable materials found in the red lid waste bin were mostly paper and cardboard, glass, plastic and metals.
  • The organic materials found in the red lid waste bin were mostly grass clippings and leaves, general food waste and food in packaging.
  • The average residential recycling bin contains 9% contamination. This is comprised of 5.3% general waste and 3.7% of materials such as clothing, crockery and scrap metal that cannot be processed through the kerbside recycling collection.
  • The average organics bin contains 2% contamination. This is comprised of 1% general waste and 1% recyclables such as glass, plastics and metals.
  [post_title] => Recycling audit hopes to educate [post_excerpt] => City of Greater Bendigo has launched a community recycling education campaign. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => recycling-audit-hopes-educate [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-08-03 18:55:38 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-08-03 08:55:38 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27754 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 20159 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2015-06-23 08:59:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-22 22:59:20 [post_content] => Footpath-indicator Al fresco dining, shop signs and products for sale on footpaths can all present irritating trip hazards to the casual pavement stroller, as well as leaving businesses and local councils open to possible personal injury claims. Happily the Greater Bendigo City Council has found a simple, yet effective, solution to these lurking dangers by using small metal discs, called trading indicators, which will be embedded in the pavement in Hargreaves Mall this weekend. The discs will guide mall tenants on where to place shop displays, goods for sale, A-frame signs and outdoor dining furniture and they will be placed three metres from shop front and at five metre intervals along the mall’s length. The council’s Environmental Health and Local Laws Manager, Susannah Milne, said the aim of the trading discs was to clear a pathway for pedestrians by reducing potential tripping hazards. “The City periodically receives complaints from residents about trip hazards in the mall caused by signs, goods or furniture being placed too close to the front of shops,” Ms Milne said. “It is very important to maintain a clear path, especially for the visually impaired, people in wheelchairs or other mobility devices, and those pushing children in strollers. “This makes it easier for the public to window shop and move around the city centre on foot, which is good for business." Ms Milne said that when council staff had acted on complaints from the public and approached traders or their staff, they said it was difficult for them to remember the rules around where everything should go and the required distance between their shop fronts and their signs, goods and furniture. “The installation of the footpath trading indicators will help mall traders and their staff to easily identify where they can and cannot place outdoor items within the pedestrian walking area,” she said. [post_title] => Bendigo Council trips out [post_excerpt] => Metal discs in pavement guide object placement. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => bendigo-council-trips-out [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-06-23 12:08:15 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-06-23 02:08:15 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=20159 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19348 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2015-04-28 17:38:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-04-28 07:38:57 [post_content] => Wetlands Local councils are installing floating wetlands in order to clean-up lakes and rivers and stormwater basins so that marine and plant life can flourish again. Common pollutants in water bodies include nitrates and phosphates and organic nutrients caused by materials like fertiliser, oil and grease from machinery, cow and dog manure and dust contained in the run-off from stormwater drains and creeks. Poor water quality can lead to algae blooms and aquatic weeds and, in worse case scenarios, the water can be robbed of oxygen and nothing can survive in it. Floating wetlands, which originated in the US and came to Australia around 10 years ago, work by creating micro eco-systems using specially designed platforms planted with a wide variety of wetland plants, which also provide a habitat for bacteria to flourish. The stable, buoyant non-biodegradable platforms contain a mix of fillers like recycled plastic, foam and shredded carpet as the growing medium and there is a water column where the plants’ roots are suspended. Although the plants absorb some nutrients and heavy metals most of the pollutants are dealt with by bacteria, which converts the nasties into gas or metabolites and renders them harmless. Bacteria can also bind sediment together so it sinks. Keith O’Donnell is the Managing Director of FIA Technology, a Victorian company which specialises in floating wetlands, and he has worked with a number of local councils across Australia. Mr O’Donnell said floating wetlands provided an efficient and durable bio-filtration system that removed nutrients and other pollutants from water bodies. He said popularity was increasing with local councils because they did a good job of improving water quality, they look good and ratepayers like them. “There’s a big movement in councils across Australia to put in stormwater harvesting projects. When you harvest it you want it to be as clean as possible. There’s certainly a role for the technology in that movement," Mr O'Donnell said. “The ratepayers absolutely love them and councils cop so much flack that if they’ve got something that really appeals to your ratepayers then they consider that money well spent.” He said there have already been some Australian local government success stories, such as the City of Swan in WA, where the council installed floating wetlands to improve the health of the water basin in north Perth. “They were struggling with phosphates and offered very expensive solutions,” Mr O’Donnell said. “They now have floating wetlands in and all the pollutants just dipped like crazy, ten per cent of what they were before over two to three years.” While floating wetlands are not cheap to install, Mr O'Donnell said they took very little maintenance, they did not need extra equipment and they had minimal operating costs. "You obviously have the upfront capital costs but there's no other infrastructure. You just float them on top, you don't have to pour concrete or anything like that." In Mildura, Vic, a Smart Water grant in 2009 paid for a large area of floating wetlands on a lake, which is the area's stormwater basin. City of Greater Bendigo is another council (not supplied by FIA Technology) that is investing in floating wetlands to improve the water quality of one of its lakes at Gateway Park. If the trial is successful, the council will consider installing similar wetlands in other Greater Bendigo urban lakes to mitigate stormwater run-off. Cairns Regional Council have also installed decorative floating wetlands, which they introduced for aesthetic reasons and other councils with floating wetlands include Adelaide City Council, City of Bayswater, WA and Redland City Council, QLD. [post_title] => Water clean-up buoyed by manufactured floating wetlands [post_excerpt] => Tackling water pollution with plant-filled platforms. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => floating-wetlands-float-councils-boats [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-04-30 22:04:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-04-30 12:04:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=19348 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7286 [post_author] => 655 [post_date] => 2013-11-15 08:47:59 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-11-15 08:47:59 [post_content] => City of Parkville sandbagging efforts June 2011 By Paul Hemsley Victoria’s City of Greater Bendigo is digging in for a fight to prevent the state government from shifting responsibility for flood levee bank funding from the Catchment Management Authorities onto local governments. The council has announced is investigating the formation of a lobbying alliance with other municipalities to oppose any potential state government plans to make local governments pay for levee bank infrastructure in flood prone areas. The affected councils are planning to write to Premier Denis Napthine as well as the Deputy Premier, the Minister for Local Government, the Minister for Agriculture and Food Security, the Minister for Environment and Climate Change and local members of state parliament in an attempt to head off the cost impost. The City of Greater Bendigo’s call to arms has follows Minister for Water Peter Walsh’s response to the Environment and Natural Resources Committee inquiry into flood mitigation infrastructure. The Inquiry concluded that there was a “need to overcome uncertainty concerning responsibilities for levee ownership and maintenance and for the management”. That recommendation led to Mr Walsh’s decision in October 2013 that “regional Victoria local councils are best placed to manage levees on behalf of their communities”. The big issue now is who will pay for levee management, with councils crying poor. Greater Bendigo’s prominent stand in the looming anti-cost shifting campaign is predictable given its history coping with extreme wet weather events including the March and September 2010 flash floods. That unexpected inundation resulted in the Bendigo Urban Flood Study being initiated in July 2011 by the North Central Catchment Management Authority (NCCMA) to produce updated flood maps that can eventually be incorporated into the Greater Bendigo Planning Scheme. The City of Greater Bendigo cited the Municipal Association of Victoria’s (MAV) breakdown of the state government’s decision, which said that the inquiry’s recommendations and the government’s subsequent response “signal a significant shift of responsibility and cost from Catchment Management Authorities to councils on the basis of a ‘beneficiary pays’ principle”. “The MAV describes this principle as an emerging State Government direction that the beneficiaries of certain infrastructure should pay, potentially through council rates,” a release from the City of Bendigo said. City of Greater Bendigo Mayor Barry Lyons is now trying to hose down any state and federal government attempt to burden ratepayers with added costs. “It is becoming all too common for both sides of politics to shift responsibility onto local government without providing adequate funding support. Ultimately, this leads to higher rates for residents and that is not fair,” Mr Lyons said. He said if the City is forced to take funding responsibility for levee banks, then the “cost burden will be significant and ongoing”. [post_title] => Vic councils sandbag against flood levee cost shifting [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => vic-councils-sandbag-against-flood-levee-cost-shifting [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-02-11 16:42:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-02-11 05:42:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 7033 [post_author] => 655 [post_date] => 2013-05-24 09:27:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-05-24 09:27:38 [post_content] =>

By Paul Hemsley

The mayor of Greater Bendigo Council has put the hard word on Victorian Premier Denis Napthine and Opposition Leader Daniel Andrews to come clean on their positions on Constitutional recognition of local government amid sniping from the state government over the looming referendum on the issue on 14th September, 2013.

The demand for clarification on the state leaders’ positions on Constitutional recognition from Mayor Lisa Ruffell comes as dozens of councils gear-up for a public showdown over why some premiers may be opposed to recognising local government in the federal Constitution.

The Victorian government has previously expressed its hostility towards Constitutional recognition of local government because claimed suspicions that the change would allow the federal government to bypass state government to fund council projects.

The federal government already directly funds many local government initiatives.

The attitude of resistant states has attracted a slew of criticism from local government associations across the country that have been campaigning hard for more than a decade for another referendum to take place.

In a letter to the Victorian Premier and Opposition Leader, Ms Ruffell stressed that the changes to the Constitution have been recommended by the Expert Panel on Constitutional Recognition of Local Government and the Federal Parliamentary Joint Select Committee on Constitutional Recognition of Local Government.

She raised the issue of the High Court case of 2009 (Pape v Commissioner of Taxation) putting funding arrangements “under a cloud” because if federal grants that were given to councils are proven to be illegal, then important future projects in Greater Bendigo could be put at risk.

“In a practical sense, such recognition will overcome any legal doubts about the Commonwealth’s ability to directly fund local government,” Ms Ruffell said.

“Given this is not a referendum about the status of local government, which is clearly the responsibility of State Parliaments and is intended to remain so, and in the wake of two High Court challenges that cast doubt about the legitimacy of the Commonwealth directly providing financial assistance to councils, the importance of this referendum cannot be understated in terms of guaranteeing certainty and continuity in the provision of community services and essential infrastructure,” Ms Ruffell wrote to the state parliament leaders.

The referendum will ask Australians whether or not local government should be recognised through an addition to Section 96 of the Constitution that previously only recognised states and would then read: “Financial assistance to states and local government bodies. During a period of ten years and after the establishment of the commonwealth and thereafter until the parliament otherwise provides, the parliament may grant financial assistance to any state, or to any local government body formed by a law of a state.”

Tensions over the referendum flared when Victorian Minister for Local Government Jeanette Powell’s said Constitutional recognition could potentially result in an erosion of state government power. Municipal Association of Victoria (MAV) president Bill McArthur then accused Ms Powell of scaremongering because of her comment.

A similar split occurred a day later in New South Wales when the joint-presidents of Local Government New South Wales (LGNSW) accused the NSW Minister for Local Government Don Page of “scaremongering” when he claimed that financial recognition of local governments could lead to pork barrelling.

A Nielsen poll published in late May 2013 by the Australian Financial Review fund that there was 60 per cent overall support for a change to financially recognise local government.

[post_title] => Bendigo mayor demands referendum clarity from Premier [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => bendigo-mayor-demands-referendum-clarity-from-premier [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-02-11 13:12:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-02-11 02:12:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6809 [post_author] => 655 [post_date] => 2012-11-08 17:12:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2012-11-08 17:12:01 [post_content] =>

By Julian Bajkowski

The City of Greater Bendigo has hit out a decision by the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) wave through the installation of 30 more pokies at Bendigo Stadium, saying its surveys show the majority of the town’s population don’t want the gambling devices.

The decision against the council is the latest in a series of stoushes where local governments are trying to limit the spread of pokies in their communities based on concerns about harmful social side-effects.

“The City continues to be concerned about the negative impact of problem gambling on the social and economic wellbeing of the community, which is the whole basis of our policy,” Greater Bendigo’s director of planning and development, Prue Mansfield said.

According to the council, Greater Bendigo held consultations with the community including polling that found 61 per cent of respondents “did not want to see additional gaming machines at the Stadium".

“This decision proves yet again how difficult it is for communities to express their concerns about the negative impact that gaming machines can have on them,” Ms Mansfield said.

“VCAT has decided that in this case, the benefit from the expanded community facilities outweighs the negative impact of gaming on vulnerable individuals and families.

Greater Bendigo’s anti-pokies stand comes as the pokies and clubs lobby continues to direct a campaign of criticism against Canberra for its implementation of trials of voluntary pre-commitment technology for pokies.

“The Federal Government has given itself the power to tax clubs and hotels to cover the huge cost of running the bureaucracy that will oversee voluntary pre-commitment technology on poker machines,” Clubs Australia said in a statement on Wednesday.

[post_title] => Greater Bendigo loses on pokies [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => greater-bendigo-loses-on-pokies [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-02-11 12:32:47 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-02-11 01:32:47 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 6 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27754 [post_author] => 670 [post_date] => 2017-08-03 18:55:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-08-03 08:55:38 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_27755" align="alignnone" width="287"]
Cr Jennifer Alden, Craig Lloyd and Cr Andrea Metcalf (L-R).[/caption] Recent audits of local waste and recycling bins have shown that Greater Bendigo residents are still sending significant amounts of recyclables straight to landfill by placing many items that could be recycled into their waste bins. In an effort to improve recycling rates, the City of Greater Bendigo has launched a new community education Sort it out before you throw it out! advertising campaign. The campaign will provide useful information about the items that residents are currently not recycling to make them aware that they can. It will utilise television, radio, print, social media and signage to encourage residents to think about and improve the way they sort their waste, organics and recycling. City of Greater Bendigo Presentation and Assets director Craig Lloyd said the City’s recent waste bin audits showed that 40% of the contents of local waste bins should have been placed in the recycling bin while 22 per cent could have gone in the organics bin. “The audit is backed up by State Government figures that place Greater Bendigo in the bottom 50 per cent of Victoria’s 79 local government areas for waste resource recovery,” said Mr Lloyd. “Unfortunately, many Greater Bendigo residents are still placing recyclables such as paper and cardboard, glass bottles and jars, cans, plastics and organic garden and food waste in their red lid waste bin. “Objects that can be recycled are a valuable resource and the cost of sending waste to landfill will continue to rise so the more we recycle and the less we send to landfill the better. “Greater Bendigo wants to become one of, if not the best, local government area for resource recovery in the future. “Many people may be surprised to learn that Greater Bendigo residents are not very good at recycling and we want to see this change for the better in the near future.” Results from the audit:-
  • The average residential red lid waste bin contains 40% recyclable items, 22% organics and 38% actual waste.
  • The recyclable materials found in the red lid waste bin were mostly paper and cardboard, glass, plastic and metals.
  • The organic materials found in the red lid waste bin were mostly grass clippings and leaves, general food waste and food in packaging.
  • The average residential recycling bin contains 9% contamination. This is comprised of 5.3% general waste and 3.7% of materials such as clothing, crockery and scrap metal that cannot be processed through the kerbside recycling collection.
  • The average organics bin contains 2% contamination. This is comprised of 1% general waste and 1% recyclables such as glass, plastics and metals.
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city-of-greater-bendigo

city-of-greater-bendigo

City of Parkville sandbagging efforts June 2011

Vic councils sandbag against flood levee cost shifting

By Paul Hemsley Victoria’s City of Greater Bendigo is digging in for a fight to prevent the state government from shifting responsibility for flood levee bank funding from the Catchment Management Authorities onto local governments. The council has announced is investigating the formation of a lobbying alliance with other municipalities to oppose any potential state […]

Bendigo mayor demands referendum clarity from Premier

By Paul Hemsley The mayor of Greater Bendigo Council has put the hard word on Victorian Premier Denis Napthine and Opposition Leader Daniel Andrews to come clean on their positions on Constitutional recognition of local government amid sniping from the state government over the looming referendum on the issue on 14th September, 2013. The demand […]

Greater Bendigo loses on pokies

By Julian Bajkowski The City of Greater Bendigo has hit out a decision by the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) wave through the installation of 30 more pokies at Bendigo Stadium, saying its surveys show the majority of the town’s population don’t want the gambling devices. The decision against the council is the latest […]