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                    [post_content] => 

 

An audit of underperformance in eight Commonwealth agencies and departments, including the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), has found there is ‘significant room for improvement’ in dealing with poor performers and that managers avoided tackling the problem and encouraged workers to take redundancy or retire instead.

The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) looked into underperformance of eight federal government agencies and departments between 2012 and 2016, including the Attorney-General’s Department; Australian Taxation Office; Department of Agriculture and Water Resources; Department of Industry, Innovation and Science; Department of Social Services; Department of Veterans’ Affairs; IP Australia; and the National Film and Sound Archive. These eight were chosen to provide a mix of size and function, as well as a mix of how they had been rated for managing poor performers by their staff.

The audit focused on how well agencies managed underperformance through policies, procedures and management practices and said it was important to address because weak performance management could impact negatively on productivity, efficiency and morale.

“In most agencies underperformance is not being accurately identified and the proportion of employees undergoing structured underperformance processes is very low in all agencies," said the report, although it found that where it was addressed agencies stuck to procedural fairness.

“Probation processes are not generally used robustly to test the suitability of newly appointed employees (except in the Australian Taxation Office and the National Film and Sound Archive).”

The Audit Office said managers should not rely on encouraging badly performing staff to take redundancies or opt for retirement, “while these may be cost-effective approaches in situations of excess staffing or in particularly complex cases they should not be used to replace or undermine ongoing, robust underperformance management procedures.”

The number of staff going through structured underperformance processes was 'very low', with the lowest rate of the eight departments being 0.03 per cent of staff at the ATO. The highest was the National Film and Sound Archive at 0.28 per cent. 

It said management culture and the lack of support and training for senior and middle managers were the main barriers in dealing with underperformance in the workplace, noting an unwillingness to tackle poor performers, give feedback or set clear expectations from some managers. 

Staff perceptions of how well government departments and agencies were doing were also unfavourable. Between 70 to 84 per cent of staff thought their department did not do a good job of managing substandard workers, although around half considered their supervisors did a decent job.  

It acknowledged that the causes of underperformance could be complex and include mental health or physical problems and personal issues as well as lax recruitment processes that fail to hire the right person for the job.  Access to training and development could also play a role.

Main findings
  • Managers often avoided addressing underperformance, mainly due to lack of support, capability or incentives to do so
  • Managers shied away from confronting poor performers, relying instead on redundancies or retirement, against Australian Public Service Commission guidelines
  • The performance management process was being underused to manage poor performers
  • Probation procedures were deficient in every agency
  • Underperformance policies needed cleaning up and the procedures managing senior staff should be made more transparent
  • Managers in every agency need to make a stronger commitment to dealing with poor performance, including setting clear expectations and giving feedback to staff
Recommendations
  • More commitment from managers to tackle poor performance, rather than using retirement or redundancy
  • Better training and support needed for managers, including the early involvement of an HR professional to help 
  • Clearer guidelines to make it easier for managers to identify inadequate performance
  • Holding managers more accountable for the way they manage underperformance
  • Improve the performance management framework with more ‘check-ins’ between managers and staff
The audit used a variety of data sources including Australian Public Service Commission data from the annual employee census and annual agency survey; agency policies and procedures and interviews with employee representatives, corporate support staff and academics. It cost the ANAO $530,000 to conduct. [post_title] => APS underperformance ignored by managers, says audit [post_excerpt] => Poor performers encouraged to resign or retire. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => aps-underperformance-left-fester-managers-says-audit [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-24 14:31:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-24 04:31:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27207 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27037 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-05-03 11:43:05 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-03 01:43:05 [post_content] =>   By Linda Cheng The NSW government‘s contentious plan to relocate the Powerhouse Museum from Ultimo near Sydney’s CBD to Parramatta in Western Sydney could result in the museum’s collections being shared between the two sites. In April, the NSW government said the relocation plans “could include keeping some Powerhouse presence at the current site in Ultimo.” The government also said it was “committed to building a truly iconic museum on the Parramatta Riverbank site,” which was selected as its preferred site in April 2016. In February 2015, the NSW government announced plans to sell the current site of the Powerhouse Museum in Ultimo, part of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, for an estimated $200 million, which would be used to fund the construction of a new museum in western Sydney. Read more here.   This story first appeared in ArchitectureAU and appears here by kind permission of the author.  [post_title] => Hopes Powerhouse Museum Ultimo could stay [post_excerpt] => Museum collection could be shared. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 27037 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-05 11:55:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-05 01:55:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27037 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26882 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-04-11 11:00:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-11 01:00:53 [post_content] => Newtown's nightlife has intensified since the 2014 lockout laws came in. Pic: Google Images.    By Lecturer in Criminology, UNSW This story first appeared in The Conversation.     It is vital that public policy be driven by rigorous research. In the last decade key policy changes have had profound impacts on nightlife in Sydney’s inner city and suburbs. The most significant and controversial of these has been the 2014 “lockout laws”. These were a series of legislative and regulatory policies aimed at reducing alcohol-related violence and disorder through new criminal penalties and key trading restrictions, including 1.30am lockouts and a 3am end to service in select urban “hotspots”. A range of lobbyists, including New South Wales Police and accident and emergency services, welcomed these initiatives. By contrast, venue operators, industry organisations and patron groups have made repeated but largely anecdotal claims that these changes caused a sharp downturn in profit, employment and cultural vibrancy in targeted areas. They also claim that the “lockouts” have caused drinking-related problems to spill over into urban areas that are less equipped to cope with them.

Crime is down

However, in late 2016, the Callinan Review referenced compelling evidence in support of the current policy. According to the latest research, recorded rates of crime are down by around 49% in the designated Kings Cross precinct and 13% in Sydney’s CBD. In contrast, what little research has been produced by opponents of strict nightlife regulation has been criticised as unreliable, inaccurate and poorly deployed.  
The pattern of assaults has shifted since the lockout laws began. BOCSAR, Author provided
The Callinan Review noted the lack of verifiable claims about the negative impacts of the policy in submissions from the main opponents of the lockout laws. This has led to a great deal of assumption in the final report about where, for example, revellers, jobs, entertainment and revenue might have been displaced to, or how the policy changes affected them. In many respects, the passing over of claims made by anti-lockout groups is rather unfair. These groups are not official state bodies with the capacity to produce the type of data or evidence on which the policy has been justified and defended. As such, their “unscientific” observations and experiences have been largely dismissed. To critically balance and juxtapose opposing claims, more impact data and research are needed.

We must take a city-wide perspective

If the lockout policy is judged on the original goal of decreasing crime in designated “hotspots”, then it appears to have been a success. However, from a city-wide perspective there are other issues to consider. Not the least of these is the effects in other nightlife sites across Sydney. Despite initially finding no displacement of violence to nearby nightlife sites, the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOCSAR) has just released findings showing significant displacement in rates of recorded non-domestic-related violence in destinations outside the lockout zone. Reported crime rates in Newtown, one of the displacement sites listed in the BOCSAR study (along with Bondi and Double Bay), increased by 17% in the 32 months following the lockouts. These new findings appear to vindicate some local complaints about increased night violence – including attacks targeting LGBTI victims – that has led to much resident irritation and even political protest in recent years.

Adjusting our nightlife habits

So, how can we better judge the veracity of these claims about the displacement of nuisance and violence? Mapping patronage trends is a key means of understanding how and why rates of assault have now increased despite initially showing little to no change. To this end, Kevin McIsaac and I, with data from Transport for NSW, have set out to ascertain if and how nightlife participation in Sydney has been influenced by the lockouts. Our analysis focused on night-time aggregated train validation data (turnstile counts) from January 2013 to July 2016 for stations servicing the designated nightlife precincts (Kings Cross, Town Hall) and precincts outside the lock-out zone (Newtown, Parramatta). Using Bayesian Change Point (BCP) detection we found the following:
  • no evidence of changes to Kings Cross or Parramatta exit traffic from the introduction of the lockout laws;
  • evidence of strong growth in the Parramatta Friday-night exit traffic by about 200% since January 2013, which is independent of the lockout laws;
  • evidence of an increase of about 300% in the Newtown Friday-night exit traffic as a result of the lock-out laws; and
  • in all stations, the BCP algorithm detected a change when OPAL card usage exceeded magnetic ticket usage. This suggests the jumps seen in the graphs below are due to the higher exit reporting from OPAL. The switch from flat to slow growth in trend is probably an artefact of the relative increase in OPAL usage.
Kings Cross change point Friday night.
Kings Cross change point Saturday night.
Newtown change point Friday night.
Newtown change point Saturday night.
Parramatta change point Friday night.
Parramatta change point Saturday night.
  These findings provide new insights into the way people have adjusted their nightlife habits. The most interesting finding is the dramatic increase in access to Newtown nightlife. Exits in Newtown have increased 300% since the lock-outs were introduced in 2014. As can be seen from the graph, the rate of increase has been steady over the study period. This raises questions about whether there is a threshold at which patron density becomes an issue that potentially results in increased nuisance and violence.

Big data’s capacity to help

While this research is still in its early phases, the transport data tell one small, yet significant, part of the story. However, to draw definite conclusions, there is far more that needs to be considered. Many nightlife patrons travel into the city by different means, or don’t travel at all (those who live in and around the city). We need alternative data to try to identify patterns concerning these groups. Several different organisations have data that could help paint a more complete picture, including telcos, Google, Taxis NSW and Uber. While these organisations should be protective of their data, the value of anonymous aggregate location data is how it can inform and advance public policy through ethical research. This information is key to breaking down access barriers. Without access to these anonymous aggregations of privately controlled data, the capacity of research is limited. As such, there is a need for greater communication, collaboration and co-operation between producers of big data, the government and researchers into social impact. By building stronger evidence for all manner of policies, such partnerships have an amazing potential to contribute to the public good. [post_title] => Public transport data begins to reveal true impact of Sydney's lockout laws [post_excerpt] => Newtown's 300% nightlife jump. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 26882 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-02 15:16:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-02 05:16:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26882 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26748 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2017-04-04 10:47:01 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-04 00:47:01 [post_content] =>     NSW largest council has rebranded itself with the help of more than 2,000 ratepayers and hit back at perceptions that it is boring. Canterbury-Bankstown Council, which was created in May last year from a merger between Canterbury City and Bankstown City Councils, launched its new logo and slogan: ‘where interesting happens’ yesterday (Monday) and released a video to accompany it. The south-western Sydney council is the state’s largest council area and has around 350,000 residents. The council’s administrator, Richard Colley, said that residents, community and sports groups and business leaders had all chipped in their thoughts on the rebranding and so had visitors, through workshops, interviews, surveys and roundtables. Mr Colley said the council involved the community from the outset so that they could 'own and be proud of' the rebranding, which reportedly cost $375,000. “It’s not every day you get to stop and think about what defines you as a place and community – we know we are multiculturally diverse, and that’s very important, but what really defines us and sets us apart from other areas and the pack,” Mr Colley said.  “It’s based on the idea “Where Interesting Happens” and will allow us to promote our fascinating stories, unique experiences and much more.” The council’s survey of ratepayers found they wanted the area to become a destination where people stopped, rather than drove through; they were proud of diversity and wanted to project a more confident image. Mr Colley said residents would see the new brand popping up in the area from this week on signs, council vehicles and PR material and that various related events would follow. “Our new city brand is about sharing what makes us special and uniting the two great cities of Canterbury and Bankstown.  It’s much more than just a logo, it’s a whole new destination marketing approach for everyone to join in, including residents, businesses, community groups, cultural institutions, sporting groups and visitors.” But the rebranding was not just about what people who live or work in the area thought.   Mr Colley said: “We also wanted to understand what people outside Canterbury-Bankstown think of us, so we can attract them to our many businesses, places and activities, and help grow our local economy.” Focus groups and online surveys of around 500 Sydneysiders from outside the Canterbury Bankstown area found that some of them had negative perceptions that there was not enough to do there. “The research showed some Sydneysiders don’t visit Canterbury-Bankstown because they think there’s not much to do here.  Well, that’s about to change! “Interestingly, we also heard, some people living in our City believe other Sydneysiders think Canterbury-Bankstown is unsafe.  We found this is not the case at all,” he said.  It’s early days but the reaction on social media have been mostly positive so far, apart from one or two digs at the council’s slogan and social media hashtag. One Facebook wag said the hashtag should be #whereoverdevelopmenthappens or #whereinfrastructureisneeded, while another criticised the slogan: “ ‘Where Interesting Happens’ isn't even a grammatically correct sentence! But then neither is ‘Think Different’ and that worked for Apple. Good luck with the new initiative.” CEO of Chess Engineering Steve Facer, who was involved in the consultation, said the process had “captured an honest and real feel of locals and non-residents”.  “They were unafraid to face whatever realities may present themselves and then have the courage to address them in an open-faced and positive way,” Mr Facer said.  “The new direction seems highly inclusive. It already has, and will continue to generate energy for a ‘can do’ area that may now start to evolve at an ever increasing rate.  I loved the bold simplicity of the package.”   What do you think of the rebranding? Want the latest public sector news delivered straight to your inbox Click here to sign up the Government News newsletter. [post_title] => Merged Sydney council rebrands itself as the place "where interesting happens” [post_excerpt] => Hits back at critics it’s boring. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 26748 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-04-04 13:15:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-04-04 03:15:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26748 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26741 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2017-04-03 17:31:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-04-03 07:31:44 [post_content] =>       More research needs to be done to reveal whether going into the public sector for altruistic reasons can lead to extra pressure, stress and eventual burn out, or whether it actually increases job satisfaction and productivity, says a recent academic paper. Researchers from Federation University and Newcastle University interviewed 455 local council workers in Victoria to find out their levels of public sector motivation (PSM) and whether this affected their levels of job satisfaction negatively or positively.  Although there is not one concrete definition, PSM has been loosely defined as wanting to contribute to society/community and to the public policy process and it is often considered to go hand in hand with commitment, compassion and self-sacrifice, an attitude seen as different to the prevailing in the private sector.  In the past, theorists have tended to focus on the positive side of PSM and its possible role in enhancing performance, reducing absenteeism and boosting staff retention. There is also an argument that high levels of PSM make employees more concerned about public service and duty and relatively less concerned about higher pay and shorter working hours.  But the report, Testing an International Measure of Public Service Motivation: Is There Really a Bright or Dark Side? says attention is now being increasingly paid to the ‘dark side’ of PSM and its possible effects, including burnout, which can be characterised by diminished interest, cynicism, or de-personalisation at work.  “High levels of PSM have, for example, been linked to lower job satisfaction due to frustrations with red tape, as well as increased pressure and stress, which in turn may result in employee burnout,” said the report.  “Indeed, motivation to serve the community through public service work may result in negative effects where employees self-sacrifice to a level that it depletes their well-being.”  So PSM can variously act as protection from burnout but too much of it could hasten exhaustion, “PSM may also possess a dark side. The notion of public service has taken on even greater importance in today’s customer-oriented public sector with ever increasing demands for quicker response time.”  However, researchers from Federation University and the University of Newcastle said they were unable to find any meaningful connection between PSM, job satisfaction and behaviour but add: “This may suggest an opportunity for public sector managers to leverage PSM to harness the beneficial outcomes commonly associated with PSM.” Why does it matter?  Well, if PSM is found to have a positive influence on behaviour and cause people to work harder, not ring in sick and refrain from jumping ship then nurturing it becomes of the utmost importance. ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­The report says: “For example, the level of PSM among employees can be increased through a variety of mechanisms such as attraction, selection, design of job packages and also managers can do more to avoid PSM being crowded out by the use of incentives and command systems.  “Further, transformational leadership can be used by managers in organisations without severe value conflicts to increase individual levels of PSM, which in turn should increase performance. This may be achieved through socialisation, greater mission valance as well as via managers and supervisors and through communication style (Waterhouse et al. 2014).”  Conversely, if high levels of PSM leave an employee more vulnerable to stress, emotional exhaustion and burnout, particularly when combined with budget cuts, bureaucracy and pressure to work more quickly, then aversive action should be taken.  Such conditions can also turn people off working in the sector. A recent Government News story explored how Gen Y’s are avoiding local government as a career. an public sector workers in Victoria,” and says this could be because public sector conditions are generally good in Australia.  This is contrasted with China, where government workers described inferior conditions to the private sector, and those with higher PSM reported higher mental well-being but lower physical well-being than those with lower PSM.  Researchers suggest replicating the study in other states and across all three tiers of government with a larger sample and carrying out in-depth interviews with public servants to find out what being public sector motivated means to them.  “Therefore, to create understanding and better outcomes for deliverers and users of public services, we advocate broader investigation into the bright and dark sides of PSM and factors that can moderate and mediate such relationships.”  The study was published in the Australian Journal of Public Administration and written by Julie Rayner and Vaughan Reimers from the Federation University and Chih-Wei (Fred) Chao from Newcastle University. 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Alcohol could soon be sold in Australian petrol stations, corner shops and supermarkets.    
By Ben Hagemann and Lucy Marrett 
.
Convenience stores, petrol stations and supermarkets should be allowed to sell alcoholic beverages, according to a Senate inquiry report into the effects of red tape on alcohol sales.Tabled in parliament yesterday at 5:45pm, the interim report recommended that the Australian Government and COAG (Council of Australian Governments) should allow “packaged alcohol to be sold in convenience stores, petrol stations and supermarkets”, and “support the sale and supply of alcohol through consideration and implementation of evidence-based policies that aim to reduce red tape and promote job creation, and business growth and investment.” The report was originally scheduled for tabling on 14 March 2017. The Red Tape Committee was established in October 2016, and as part of its inquiry, has looked at the effect of red tape on the economy and community while focusing on a number of factors, including the assessment and reduction of red tape legislation in relation to the sale of alcohol.
  Read more here. This story first appeared in C&I Week.  [post_title] => Red Tape Committee approves booze sales in supermarkets, shops and servos [post_excerpt] => Senate inquiry backs abolishing liquor store trading hours. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => red-tape-committee-approves-booze-sales-convenience-stores [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-31 11:28:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-31 00:28:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26714 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26682 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2017-03-28 11:15:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-28 00:15:41 [post_content] =>     Local government experts are predicting a serious shortfall in skilled staff within ten years as Gen Y’s shun local councils and Baby Boomers clinging on until retirement start to fall off their perches. A four-year benchmarking survey led by Local Government Professional Australia, NSW involving 135 NSW, Western Australian and New Zealand councils, found that while council workforces are ageing they are finding it hard to attract and retain younger people, especially Gen Y’s. Councils analysed their own performance on a range of indicators, including service provision, finance and operations, risk management, assets and leadership but it was the makeup of local council workforces that set alarm bells ringing. Gen Y’s are woefully underrepresented in councils and they are also much more likely to quit within a year when they do get local government jobs. The situation is most acute in NSW. CEO of LG Professionals, NSW Annalisa Haskell predicted a staffing crisis within a decade if the generation gap was not addressed. “You’re looking at a major, major issue. We won’t be able to do the work in the future,” Ms Haskell said. “Due to a uniquely old age profile quite at odds with the Australian working population, NSW local government is failing to significantly attract and retain new staff, especially Gen Y, who are twice as likely to leave a council than other generations,” she said. She said the battle over forced council mergers in NSW had also sapped the sector’s energy and pulled the focus away from what was arguably a much more serious issue: staffing. “We are having the wrong conversation. We need to move from the structure debate of mergers to understanding why local government is not positioned as a vibrant place to work compared to other Australian sectors, nor the place to invest in a career.” In NSW councils, Gen Y’s represent about 40 per cent of the Australian working population in 2016 but they only make up 22 per cent of NSW council workforces. In WA it is 26 per cent and in New Zealand Gen Y’s make up 28 per cent of the council workforce. While Baby Boomers are sticking around for decades and hoarding their leave, particularly in NSW, Gen Y’s that do start working for councils often don’t stay long.   In NSW, 19 per cent of Gen Y left within a year, compared with a 9.9 per cent turnover of all staff. It was higher in WA, where one in five Gen Y’s quit within a year, but the all staff turnover was also higher, at 13.8 per cent so the gap was less.  Meanwhile, Baby Boomers represent 35 per cent of the Australian working age population in 2016 but 44 per cent of NSW council staff. In contrast, New Zealand does not have a problem with staff turnover, attracts more Gen Y’s and does a much better job at attracting women to local government, particularly at supervisory level or above. Women represent 57 per cent of new starters in New Zealand, compared with 50 per cent in WA and 43 per cent in NSW. Why is Gen Y turning away from councils? Ms Haskell says that local government in NSW has a serious image problem and Gen Y’s viewed it as staid, slow and technologically backward. Council jobs also seemed to lack economic prestige. “The sector isn’t appealing to Gen Y. They like the experience to be good,” Ms Haskell said. “Councils are by nature conservative and regulation bound and [generally] not very high tech. They are driven by compliance and the regulatory point of view.” She said Gen Y were likely to ask why things were not instant and people not engaged. They were digital natives too.  “The problems we have are here now and will take time to fix - it is most apparent that we need to better promote local government as a compelling career sector,” she said. The falling numbers of Gen Y girls taking subjects such as maths and sciences had also been felt in certain areas of council work, such as engineering and environmental jobs, which were often quite specialised. Baby Boomers entrenched in their jobs meant there was an older leadership, sometimes at odds with Gen Y’s, and no obvious stepping stones for younger people. “There is a generational split. The leadership is old and it’s not moving. Gen Y’s are likely to ask: ‘where is my career path and is this really me?’ ” Mergers may also have been partly responsible for Baby Boomers staying in their jobs and accruing leave – a real liability for councils – because of the uncertainty of job losses generated by amalgamations. In contrast, New Zealand’s councils had little leave on the balance sheet. No Plan B Worrying, Ms Haskell said that the majority of councils had no succession planning in place. Rather than training Gen X and Gen Y to step up when senior staff retired, corporate memory walked out the door when Boomers left. Only 13 per cent of NSW councils had proper succession planning in place in 2016, a drop from 20 per cent the previous year. “With the Baby Boomers it’s all in their head and they’ve been the [council’s] anchor point. They haven’t got a succession plan ready. I’m surprised,” she said. GMs sometimes had to quit suddenly because of serious health issues or accidents and external managers were parachuted into the role temporarily, rather than moving somebody into the role in-house. Many councils did not have a deputy general manager, for example. Ms Haskell said: “[We’re] dependent as a sector because of the nature of politics: ‘no-one else can do it except the GM’. That’s a real gap and we have to take responsibility.” What can be done? Ms Haskell said that encouraging Gen Y’s to network online and to share their ideas and experiences and to lead on certain issues would help. Councils also needed to change the way they worked, connected and communicated. For example, making customer experience central and working back and supporting staff to deliver on this. “Some councils are trying to get there but they’re in the minority. Gen Y’s have to drive it themselves,” she said. Councils could check in with Gen Y recruits at the three-month stage and ask them about their experiences and perceptions anonymously and exit interviews were useful to find out what had gone wrong and how it could be fixed. She said the sector needed to work together to motive people and share solutions but the threat of council mergers had hampered this spirit over the last three years and pulled councils apart, with many going into lockdown and survival mode. Succession planning had to be faced up to and people mentored and trained to take over. So what is New Zealand doing right? Ms Haskell said the Kiwis were bringing in new people from non-government sectors and attracting management skills externally. “[There are] more women in senior positions all the way up than in Australia.” “In NSW, we appear to attract less [outside] talent to the sector and less from managerial roles that can make a difference culturally.” New Zealand had also mounted a successful advertising campaign to attract young people to the sector. The Australasian LG Performance Excellence Program survey, conducted in partnership with PwC, also involved nine merged NSW councils – previously 22 individual councils – and should help give merged councils a picture of their performance before and after mergers.  PwC Partner Stuart Shinfield praised the participating councils and said CEOs and General Managers ‘have had to lay themselves bare’. “The heroes in this are the managers of the vast number of councils involved,” Mr Shinfield said. “No-one told them they had to drill-down like this – they took the front foot and said ‘Let’s do this’, whereas in the commercial sector this high-level of analytical review usually only happens when someone has been given a directive.” [post_title] => Gen Y’s shun local councils: Massive skill gap predicted in a decade [post_excerpt] => Baby Boomers won't budge. 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    Coopers Brewery has apologised over a recent Bible Society video which saw two Liberal MPs discussing marriage equality while drinking Coopers Premium Light on the Queen's Terrace at Parliament House. The clip sparked a major backlash against the Adelaide-based brewery after the Bible Society aired a debate featuring gay Victorian MP Tim Wilson and conservative Christian MP Andrew Hastie discussing their opposing views on marriage equality. Mr Wilson, a former Human Rights Commissioner, supports gay marriage whereas Mr Hastie does not. The debate was part of a Bible Society series called' Keeping it Light' with the idea behind it being to have 'light conversations on the heaviest topics'. The Bible Society’s slogan is ‘live light’.  The debate series was to form part of the Society's 200th anniversary, which was to feature on some of Coopers Lights' commemorative cans and include verses from the Bible.   Canned: Coopers' Bible Society commemorative cans.    But the video spectacularly backfired with activists objecting to what they said were its trivialising of the issues and heavy product placement, as well as objecting to the beer giant's long association with the Bible Society. Sydney pubs The Newtown Hotel and The Hollywood Hotel and Melbourne bars Mollie Bar and Diner, Sircuit Bar and The Old Bar were some of the venues that decided to ditch Coopers, following the Bible Society’s disastrous multi-media foray. Coopers, also one of the top backers of the South Australian Liberals, went into damage control mode last night, issuing an apology fronted by its Managing Director, Dr Tim Cooper and Melanie Cooper Director of Finance and Corporate Affairs. During the apology Dr Cooper said: “Coopers never intended to make light of such an important issue, and would never and did not approve the making or release of the Bible Society video ‘debate’. “Our company’s guiding principles have centred around respect for others, and, as such, the recent activity surrounding the video made by the Bible Society has conflicted with our core values.” Ms Cooper said the company had cancelled its Bible Society commemorative cans, which also featured Bible verses, and would be joining Australian Marriage Equality. “Our company supports marriage equality,” Ms Cooper said. “Offence has been taken by our recent involvement, for which we are deeply sorry. We have listened to a range of community views, we acknowledge this feedback and respect everyone’s individual opinions and beliefs.” But some posters on the company’s Facebook page derided the apology and criticised the participants for reading off an autocue. “Worst auto cue reading ever. All they needed to say is "we’re sorry...please let us go back to making fists full of money," said one. Others disagreed:  “I think they are probably doing the best they can. They certainly look both serious and humble, and they are both facing the camera and speaking those words. I think we should take them at face value. It's the apology we were after.”   The original ill-fated Bible Society video with Tim Wilson, Matt Andrews and Andrew Hastie. Pic: Bible Society/Vimeo screengrab.    Meanwhile, the Bible Society maintained that Coopers had no involvement in the video. “Bible Society is entirely responsible for the ‘Keeping it Light’ video. It was not sponsored by Coopers. No money has changed hands between Bible Society and Coopers in regards to this campaign. “Bible Society remains grateful to Coopers for both the release of light beer commemorating our bicentenary and their support through their foundation for the distribution of bibles to the Defence Force and those who need them.”   Want the latest public sector news delivered straight to your inbox? Click here to sign up the Government News newsletter. [post_title] => Coopers apologises for Bible Society ‘keep it light’ gay marriage video [post_excerpt] => Offers to join Australian Marriage Equality. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => coopers-apologises-bible-society-keep-light-gay-marriage-video [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-17 09:55:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-16 22:55:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26531 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26489 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-03-10 09:52:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-09 22:52:11 [post_content] =>  Scott Leach, National and NSW President of the AHA     OPINION By Scott Leach, National and NSW President of the Australian Hotels Association.   Here’s an interesting fact you won’t have read about recently. After publicans in Newtown voluntarily came up with and adopted a raft of measures in September 2015, incidents of non-domestic assault in Newtown have fallen by 10.6 per cent. During the same trial period – again thanks to these measures – incidents of non-domestic assault occurring in Newtown’s licensed premises fell by an astonishing 51.8 per cent – or more than halved. Surprised? You should be given the latest release of yet another lot of figures on the Kings Cross/Sydney CBD lockouts by the Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOCSAR). In that set of figures BOCSAR argued assaults in a range of areas surrounding the lockout zone – grouped together and called the “distal displacement area” (but more commonly known to you and me as Newtown, Double Bay, Bondi and Coogee) had gone up about 17 per cent since the lockouts came into effect. All of the geographically different entertainment precincts were lumped in together – individual breakdowns for the suburbs were not included. The success of the publicans of Newtown, the police of Newtown and the community of Newtown over more than a year was ignored – it was as if it didn’t even happen as the BOCSAR figures were quoted verbatim in the press, on radio and on TV.   Read more here. This story first appeared in The Shout.   Want the latest public sector news delivered straight to your inbox? Click here to sign up the Government News newsletter. [post_title] => Sydney lock-out statistics ignore Newtown’s success, says pub peak body [post_excerpt] => Newtown Liquor Accord has worked. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sydney-lock-statistics-ignores-newtowns-success-says-pub-peak-body [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-14 12:23:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-14 01:23:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26489 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26461 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-03-07 11:49:37 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-07 00:49:37 [post_content] =>     By Toni Jones, Partner, KPMG Enterprise All councils have to deliver on the mantra of doing more with less and constraint is often a trigger for innovation.  In the case of local government in Victoria, the introduction of ‘Fair Go rate capping’ has been the catalyst for many councils to critically reassess the way they run their organisations, responding and meeting to the needs of citizens, providing the best of services, and doing so with maturity and efficiency.  Since commencing the role of CEO Mornington Peninsula Shire, Carl Cowie has made a number of changes to drive efficiency and improve service provision.  He took on the role from the private sector over two years ago and says although rate capping has not impacted his approach, it now helps his argument.   Mornington Peninsula Shire has over 1,200 staff, a $28 million debt, multi-million dollar contracts with major contractors and a revenue of $220 million. For Carl Cowie, that’s equivalent to running a business.  He says that the private sector is a benchmark of efficiency and profit maximization and equates ratepayers to shareholders. For him, the obligation of councils is to provide the best possible return for the money ratepayers pay to local government. Rate capping means that with declining income, councils have to think radically to provide ratepayers with similar or better services over a ten year plan. Many of the 79 Victorian councils are facing deficits between revenue earned from rateable properties and their running costs.  Some already feel the impact; for others, this will come later.  Mature councils with stable population growth and limited revenue growth from rateable properties, are facing the challenge of meeting citizens’ needs, determining what services to provide and their appropriate delivery model. They’re questioning where to innovate, and how to deliver in the most efficient and cost effective way.  This includes procurement and the potentially overlooked opportunity of exploring other revenue-generating opportunities, particularly where large land and property portfolios exist.  Growth area councils benefit from population growth and increasing revenue, however in addition to the challenges faced by mature councils, they also need to fund new infrastructure requirements and respond to an increasing and changing demographic demanding new and different services.  In addition, they need to build internal organizational capability and maturity to transition from what were largely rural councils to large and fast growing urban organisations. This requires not only skilled resources, and mature processes but the introduction of smart innovation technology solutions. The expectations of citizens and constituents is also changing and driving their interaction with councils, their expectations of services offered and the level of maturity of councils in the data and information they hold and manage on their behalf.  This reflects a growing recognition that citizens are ‘customers’ who expect the same ease and speed of service from government that they currently enjoy from leading commercial providers. Michael Hiller, KPMG National Leader for Infrastructure, Government and Healthcare, says that the nominal lack of competition within government means customers can’t ‘leave’ per se, but the old adage of immunity no longer holds true.  He believes that today, customers aren’t afraid to express themselves when service levels don’t meet their expectations, and the presence of social media and 24 hour news add pressure to show that issues are being addressed. In his experience, customers will no longer accept a public sector that is behind the times. They want their tax dollars spent wisely and expect good service, meaning the sector must keep up with the pace of change set by the private sector. In addition, demographics are changing and community areas now have a mix of generations and ethnicities impacting on the way such ‘customers’ want to interact with councils, and how councils interact across these diverse community needs. All of this is complicated by the current technology situation faced by many councils.  KPMG has assisted several councils plan for their IT strategy, and we have seen a significant majority starting from the same position and with the same pain points.  By and large councils have acquired disparate IT systems, some of which are 20 to 30 years old, and now support a complex technology environment, with often hundreds of software applications supported through a set of customised integrations, and aging infrastructure.  There has been under-investment in IT, with technology historically not seen as an enabler to business. Typically, few CIOs have a seat at the executive table.  Technology’s speed of advancement and the capabilities now available presents a compelling argument for transformation.  Cloud technology is a game changer for local councils, as well as any medium sized business.  Martin Hopley, CIO at Mornington Peninsula Shire, is one advocate, acknowledging the Cloud has enabled councils to quickly adapt and run their business from anywhere.  Technology companies are also now willing to invest and work with councils to develop and test potential solutions.  This brings healthy competition and a range of options that weren’t available in the sector before.  So why is now the right time to transform and disrupt?  For many councils, rate capping has been the blunt instrument forcing structural reform.  The release valve of guaranteed revenue no longer exists. For Steven Lambert, Director City Transformation, Wyndham City Council, within the new environment, local councils must live within their means like never done before.  At the same time, these hard choices on what services to provide and how to deliver them will drive efficiencies and priorities, creating a new landscape for partnerships, more sophisticated service planning, and initiatives such as shared council services, reliance on private sector partnerships and more efficient procurement.    Want the latest public sector news delivered straight to your inbox? Click here to sign up to the Government News newsletter.
[post_title] => Victorian local government: Ripe for disruption under ratecapping [post_excerpt] => Triggers for innovation. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 26461 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-07 11:49:37 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-07 00:49:37 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26461 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26443 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2017-03-07 05:00:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-06 18:00:43 [post_content] => One Nation leader Pauline Hanson is keen to get her own craft beer label.      Renegade Melbourne brewers East 9th Brewing Unlimited say they have a protest cider ready for drinkers in response to Pauline Hanson’s recent surprise announcement that she wants to produce her own craft beer. East 9th brewery’s Fog City cloudy cider includes a range called The People Vs, which was launched earlier this year. Each case of cider contains a random selection of bottles bearing politically charged labels like: ‘Legalise the Green: Hempire Strikes Back’; ‘Still Hate Tony Abbott’ and ‘Shut Up Govt Of Course It’s a Yes to Gay Marriage’. The company says the idea behind the range is to ‘positively protest the injustices of bigoted politicians, laws and prejudices’ and one of the most recently coined slogans has captured the political zeitgeist. East 9th brewers Josh Lefers, Stephen Wools and Benjamin Cairns' new cider label says ‘I’d Swap Pauline For A Refugee’, in protest against the One Nation leader’s strident stance towards refugees. East 9th Brewing Director Mr Lefers says he is happy to dispatch a few bottles to Ms Hanson’s Queensland home, particularly if it helps soften her views on immigration: “Maybe it will inform her thinking.” “Our new slogan ‘I’d Swap Pauline For A Refugee’ is aimed at lobbying Pauline Hanson, her inhumane refugee policies, and every person with beliefs like hers that create a terrible energy in the world,” he says. “We’re happy to go head-to-head with people like Pauline – and Pauline. She hasn’t brewed anything yet, apart from a whole lot of bad ideas.” Ms Hanson apparently came up with the idea of having her own craft beer after reflecting upon how much she enjoyed having a beer and a chat with ordinary Australians. She thought it would help her connect more with voters. Lefers says she isn’t wrong here: “For sure. It’s about the idea of sharing moments. Social things like that connect people.” He says he is not trying to say that everybody should have the same values, merely to present another view in the hope that positive sentiment will win out. His cider is designed to present that opposing view. “Nobody else has played the philosophical or ideological base and that’s what we have always gone for,” he says. “The reality is, it’s people like Pauline and Trump nobody is going up against in the commercial world.”   Fog City activist cider will take on Pauline Hanson in the pub.    Ms Hanson is currently looking for a brewer to work with on her craft beer. Lefers says: “We won’t make it for her but if she showed some open-minded values, for sure.” The three men designed the range after sharing stories about activists in 1970s San Francisco who challenged power and authority and lived alternative lifestyles. “Some of our crew suggested we should jot down our own activist slogans that reflected beliefs we were passionate about. So we did, and we threw them into a hat… and what we pulled out became the bones of The People Vs. series.” The People Vs. is billed as ‘a bitter-sweet premium cider naturally engineered from our gathered blend of apples and pears’. The makers have said they will continuously update the label slogans. Fog City activist cider is available from independent retailers nationally. Want the latest public sector news delivered straight to your inbox? Click here to sign up to the Government News newsletter. [post_title] => Battle brewing: Cider activists take on Pauline Hanson’s craft beer [post_excerpt] => Will ideological ale pass the pub test? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => pauline-hanson-one-nation-craft-beer-cider-polar-slider-east-9th-brewing-pubs-josh-lefers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-07 10:39:57 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-06 23:39:57 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26443 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26437 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-03-06 15:35:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-06 04:35:16 [post_content] =>     By Andy Young A new study by the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOCSAR) has found that assaults have increased in areas around the Kings Cross and Sydney CBD lockout precincts. While the areas within the Entertainment Precinct defined by the lockout laws continue to show downward trends in non-domestic assaults in neighbouring areas, where no such laws exist, it is a different story. The BOCSAR figures show the suburbs bordering the lockout zone, which includes The Star Casino plus other venues around Ultimo and Surry Hills, have seen a 12 per cent increase in non-domestic assaults. Other areas close to the lockout zone, including Double Bay, Newtown and Bondi, have seen a 17 per cent rise in non-domestic assaults. The report says: “The statistically significant rise in the surrounding and nearby suburbs, as well as the generally stable state-wide trend in non-domestic assaults, lend further support to the proposition that the drop in the target sites was due to the specific licensing restrictions affecting those sites rather than other unmeasured factors (e.g. economic conditions) or other components of the liquor law reforms (e.g. bottle shop closures).”   Read more here.   This story first appeared in The Shout.  [post_title] => Assaults up around Sydney lockout zones, says BOCSAR report [post_excerpt] => But falling in Kings Cross and Sydney CBD. 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    By Jackie Keast Organisations from across Australia’s creative and content industries have urged the government not to adopt the Productivity Commission’s proposed changes to copyright law. In a joint statement, The Copyright Agency, APRA AMCOS, Screenrights, the Australian Society of Authors, the Australian Recording Industry Association, FreeTV Australia, News Corp, Foxtel, Australian Screen Association, Screen Producers Australia and the Australian Publishers Association described the Commssion’s recommendations on copyright, as laid out in its recent intellectual property report, as “based on faulty premises and misunderstandings.” The commission’s report was handed down last December, the result of a 12-month inquiry. It argued that Australia’s current IP arrangements “fall short in many ways” and that various improvements are required. One of those areas was copyright protection, the scope of which the Commission argued was presently too broad.   Read more here.   This story first appeared in Inside Film. [post_title] => Creatives angst over Productivity Commission's copyright changes [post_excerpt] => Australian content could fall. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => content-industry-organisations-unite-proposed-copyright-changes [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-17 11:28:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-17 00:28:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26279 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [13] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26259 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-02-15 16:07:53 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-15 05:07:53 [post_content] =>     By Vanessa Cavasinni, editor Australian Hotelier A lobby of roughly 20 Sydney hoteliers and other stakeholders has formed the City Safe proposal – a strategy that will see manifestly compliant venues push for exemptions to lockout legislation. The City Safe concept puts forth a two-pronged strategy to the New South Wales Government: firstly, that CBD and Kings Cross venues that can prove that they are compliant and implementing best practice policies through electronic incident registers will be exempted from the lockouts and return to their previous licensed trading hours. Exemptions have already been catered for in legislation – both the CBD and Kings Cross Precinct regulations have made provision for exemptions. The half-hour extension for live music venues, as implemented after the Callinan Review recommendation, uses these very provisions. The City Safe proposal would not need legislation to change, just government policy. The second facet of the City Safe proposal is to turn these exempted venues into ‘Sydney Safe Venues’. This program would work similarly to the Neighbourhood Watch programs prevalent in the 1990s. In essence, a Sydney Safe Venue, would have a sticker on their façade announcing themselves as such, and would provide shelter to anyone feeling vulnerable on the street. The venue would provide refuge while you wait for transport, will call an ambulance or police if necessary, and provide basic first aid and water.   Read more here.  This story first appeared in The Shout.  [post_title] => City Safe strategy a 'win-win' proposal on Sydney lockouts [post_excerpt] => Well-behaved venues want to create safe zones for night owls. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 26259 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-15 16:07:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-15 05:07:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26259 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 14 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 27207 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2017-05-24 12:33:44 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-05-24 02:33:44 [post_content] =>   An audit of underperformance in eight Commonwealth agencies and departments, including the Australian Taxation Office (ATO), has found there is ‘significant room for improvement’ in dealing with poor performers and that managers avoided tackling the problem and encouraged workers to take redundancy or retire instead. The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) looked into underperformance of eight federal government agencies and departments between 2012 and 2016, including the Attorney-General’s Department; Australian Taxation Office; Department of Agriculture and Water Resources; Department of Industry, Innovation and Science; Department of Social Services; Department of Veterans’ Affairs; IP Australia; and the National Film and Sound Archive. These eight were chosen to provide a mix of size and function, as well as a mix of how they had been rated for managing poor performers by their staff. The audit focused on how well agencies managed underperformance through policies, procedures and management practices and said it was important to address because weak performance management could impact negatively on productivity, efficiency and morale. “In most agencies underperformance is not being accurately identified and the proportion of employees undergoing structured underperformance processes is very low in all agencies," said the report, although it found that where it was addressed agencies stuck to procedural fairness. “Probation processes are not generally used robustly to test the suitability of newly appointed employees (except in the Australian Taxation Office and the National Film and Sound Archive).” The Audit Office said managers should not rely on encouraging badly performing staff to take redundancies or opt for retirement, “while these may be cost-effective approaches in situations of excess staffing or in particularly complex cases they should not be used to replace or undermine ongoing, robust underperformance management procedures.” The number of staff going through structured underperformance processes was 'very low', with the lowest rate of the eight departments being 0.03 per cent of staff at the ATO. The highest was the National Film and Sound Archive at 0.28 per cent.  It said management culture and the lack of support and training for senior and middle managers were the main barriers in dealing with underperformance in the workplace, noting an unwillingness to tackle poor performers, give feedback or set clear expectations from some managers.  Staff perceptions of how well government departments and agencies were doing were also unfavourable. Between 70 to 84 per cent of staff thought their department did not do a good job of managing substandard workers, although around half considered their supervisors did a decent job.   It acknowledged that the causes of underperformance could be complex and include mental health or physical problems and personal issues as well as lax recruitment processes that fail to hire the right person for the job.  Access to training and development could also play a role. Main findings
  • Managers often avoided addressing underperformance, mainly due to lack of support, capability or incentives to do so
  • Managers shied away from confronting poor performers, relying instead on redundancies or retirement, against Australian Public Service Commission guidelines
  • The performance management process was being underused to manage poor performers
  • Probation procedures were deficient in every agency
  • Underperformance policies needed cleaning up and the procedures managing senior staff should be made more transparent
  • Managers in every agency need to make a stronger commitment to dealing with poor performance, including setting clear expectations and giving feedback to staff
Recommendations
  • More commitment from managers to tackle poor performance, rather than using retirement or redundancy
  • Better training and support needed for managers, including the early involvement of an HR professional to help 
  • Clearer guidelines to make it easier for managers to identify inadequate performance
  • Holding managers more accountable for the way they manage underperformance
  • Improve the performance management framework with more ‘check-ins’ between managers and staff
The audit used a variety of data sources including Australian Public Service Commission data from the annual employee census and annual agency survey; agency policies and procedures and interviews with employee representatives, corporate support staff and academics. It cost the ANAO $530,000 to conduct. [post_title] => APS underperformance ignored by managers, says audit [post_excerpt] => Poor performers encouraged to resign or retire. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => aps-underperformance-left-fester-managers-says-audit [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-05-24 14:31:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-05-24 04:31:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=27207 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 155 [max_num_pages] => 12 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => 1 [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 70ddc21142ced0f7eca6e6eab0428d39 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

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