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                    [post_date] => 2017-03-31 11:24:36
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Alcohol could soon be sold in Australian petrol stations, corner shops and supermarkets.    
By Ben Hagemann and Lucy Marrett 
.
Convenience stores, petrol stations and supermarkets should be allowed to sell alcoholic beverages, according to a Senate inquiry report into the effects of red tape on alcohol sales.Tabled in parliament yesterday at 5:45pm, the interim report recommended that the Australian Government and COAG (Council of Australian Governments) should allow “packaged alcohol to be sold in convenience stores, petrol stations and supermarkets”, and “support the sale and supply of alcohol through consideration and implementation of evidence-based policies that aim to reduce red tape and promote job creation, and business growth and investment.” The report was originally scheduled for tabling on 14 March 2017. The Red Tape Committee was established in October 2016, and as part of its inquiry, has looked at the effect of red tape on the economy and community while focusing on a number of factors, including the assessment and reduction of red tape legislation in relation to the sale of alcohol.
  Read more here. This story first appeared in C&I Week.  [post_title] => Red Tape Committee approves booze sales in supermarkets, shops and servos [post_excerpt] => Senate inquiry backs abolishing liquor store trading hours. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => red-tape-committee-approves-booze-sales-convenience-stores [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-31 11:28:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-31 00:28:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26714 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26489 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-03-10 09:52:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-09 22:52:11 [post_content] =>  Scott Leach, National and NSW President of the AHA     OPINION By Scott Leach, National and NSW President of the Australian Hotels Association.   Here’s an interesting fact you won’t have read about recently. After publicans in Newtown voluntarily came up with and adopted a raft of measures in September 2015, incidents of non-domestic assault in Newtown have fallen by 10.6 per cent. During the same trial period – again thanks to these measures – incidents of non-domestic assault occurring in Newtown’s licensed premises fell by an astonishing 51.8 per cent – or more than halved. Surprised? You should be given the latest release of yet another lot of figures on the Kings Cross/Sydney CBD lockouts by the Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOCSAR). In that set of figures BOCSAR argued assaults in a range of areas surrounding the lockout zone – grouped together and called the “distal displacement area” (but more commonly known to you and me as Newtown, Double Bay, Bondi and Coogee) had gone up about 17 per cent since the lockouts came into effect. All of the geographically different entertainment precincts were lumped in together – individual breakdowns for the suburbs were not included. The success of the publicans of Newtown, the police of Newtown and the community of Newtown over more than a year was ignored – it was as if it didn’t even happen as the BOCSAR figures were quoted verbatim in the press, on radio and on TV.   Read more here. This story first appeared in The Shout.   Want the latest public sector news delivered straight to your inbox? Click here to sign up the Government News newsletter. [post_title] => Sydney lock-out statistics ignore Newtown’s success, says pub peak body [post_excerpt] => Newtown Liquor Accord has worked. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sydney-lock-statistics-ignores-newtowns-success-says-pub-peak-body [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-14 12:23:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-14 01:23:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26489 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26437 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-03-06 15:35:16 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-06 04:35:16 [post_content] =>     By Andy Young A new study by the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOCSAR) has found that assaults have increased in areas around the Kings Cross and Sydney CBD lockout precincts. While the areas within the Entertainment Precinct defined by the lockout laws continue to show downward trends in non-domestic assaults in neighbouring areas, where no such laws exist, it is a different story. The BOCSAR figures show the suburbs bordering the lockout zone, which includes The Star Casino plus other venues around Ultimo and Surry Hills, have seen a 12 per cent increase in non-domestic assaults. Other areas close to the lockout zone, including Double Bay, Newtown and Bondi, have seen a 17 per cent rise in non-domestic assaults. The report says: “The statistically significant rise in the surrounding and nearby suburbs, as well as the generally stable state-wide trend in non-domestic assaults, lend further support to the proposition that the drop in the target sites was due to the specific licensing restrictions affecting those sites rather than other unmeasured factors (e.g. economic conditions) or other components of the liquor law reforms (e.g. bottle shop closures).”   Read more here.   This story first appeared in The Shout.  [post_title] => Assaults up around Sydney lockout zones, says BOCSAR report [post_excerpt] => But falling in Kings Cross and Sydney CBD. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => lockout [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-07 10:13:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-06 23:13:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26437 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26270 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-02-17 10:38:57 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-02-16 23:38:57 [post_content] =>
      By Deborah Jackson, Editor National Liquor News A proposal to ban alcohol advertising on public transport in Western Australia has been slammed by the alcohol industry. The Western Australia Labor party has announced that a future Labor Government would honour current advertising contracts but would ban all new advertising of alcohol-related products on public transport. It is understood that the Liberal-led Government does not support a ban because advertising on public transport generates about $7 million in revenue per year of which about 10 per cent is generated through alcohol-related advertising, and all advertising on public assets must comply with industry advertising standards, which is the case in WA. Fergus Taylor, the Executive Director of Alcohol Beverages Australia (ABA) said that the Labor Government's stance is poorly thought out and is not supported by credible research or data. “This is a poor policy decision taken on the run without industry consultation and isn’t even supported by official Government data,” Taylor said. “The government has made a sensible decision to reject this proposal after a more thorough assessment of the evidence.   Read more here. This story first appeared in The Shout.  [post_title] => Proposed booze advertising ban on WA public transport [post_excerpt] => But $7m revenue at stake. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => booze-ban-wa-public-transport [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-17 11:39:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-17 00:39:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26270 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 25969 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2017-01-10 11:39:38 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-01-10 00:39:38 [post_content] => keep-queensland-open_opt   By Andy Young This story first appeared in The Shout.    The Queensland Government has said that if the first stage of its plans to reduced late-night violence proves effective, the second stage of changes, which include 1am lockouts, may not be introduced. Speaking earlier in January, Queensland’s Acting Premier Jackie Trad said that the Government was expecting an interim report into the first six months of its alcohol restrictions and that it would then “make a decision in the interests of Queenslanders based on the Queensland experience.” The second stage of the alcohol restrictions is due to be implemented on 1 February and other Queensland Ministers have backed the possibility of either delaying or completely ditching stage two. Minister Grace Grace said: “We have now had a good six months of the reduced hours and we find that reducing the hours of alcohol consumption goes a long way to reducing the number of alcohol-fuelled violence incidences. I am well aware of what the licensees’ views are of the lockout laws but let’s wait for the report, let’s see what the report says and then the government will consider that when it is received. “This is a package of solutions and the government is looking forward to the report to see how all of this is working.” Our Nightlife Queensland Secretary Nick Braban told The Shout that he was “hopeful” the 1am lockouts would not go ahead. Read more here.  [post_title] => Queensland lockouts laws could be shelved [post_excerpt] => Interim report the key. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => queensland-lockouts-laws-shelved [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-01-10 11:45:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-01-10 00:45:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=25969 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 25883 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2016-12-20 10:31:35 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-12-19 23:31:35 [post_content] => A woman's hand reaches out to select a bottle of red wine from the shelf of a wine shop   By Deborah Jackson, editor National Liquor News The two-year trial which enabled packaged retail liquor outlets in NSW to trade on Boxing Day is in its final year. The trial was announced in late 2015, following seven years of lobbying by the Liquor Stores Association of NSW (LSA NSW) and other retail industry stakeholders. While Boxing Day remains a 'restricted trading day' a general exemption was created which enabled packaged retail liquor outlets to trade on 26 December on the condition that staff had freely elected to work 'without coercion or threats made by, or on behalf of, the retailer'. The exemption was for a two-year period with consideration for permanent reform or otherwise following the Government conducting an independent review before November 2017 (Parliament will be required to consider the matter at that time). LSA NSW estimates that Boxing Day trading allows more than 180,000 additional customers across the state to take advantage of the convenience offered by having more liquor stores open.   Read more here. This story first appeared in The Shout.  [post_title] => Boxing Day booze trading trial to end [post_excerpt] => Retailers pursue permanent reform. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => boxing-day-booze-trading-trial-end [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-12-21 12:52:50 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-12-21 01:52:50 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=25883 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 24997 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2016-09-13 13:11:12 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-09-13 03:11:12 [post_content] => newtown_opt The night-time economies of suburbs like Newtown have boomed since the lock-out laws were introduced, found the review.   NSW's lock-out laws should be relaxed and bottle shops should close later, recommends an independent review into the state's lock-out laws. Yesterday (Tuesday) the government immediately released the results of the independent review into NSW’s liquor laws by retired judge Hon Ian Callinan QC. In his review, Justice Callinan has suggested that the government considered making a few changes including:
  • Giving people an extra hour to get to the bottle shop by extending the state-wide sale of takeaway alcohol from 10pm to 11pm.
  • Relaxing the 1.30am lockout and 3am last drinks for live entertainment venues to a 2am lockout and 3.30am last drinks for a two-year trial period
  • Extending the home delivery of alcohol from 10pm to midnight
The report, including its conclusions, is available here. Justice Callinan's conclusions included:
  • There have been reduced admissions to hospital emergency departments because of the laws
  • Police have been freed up to tackle non-alcohol related crime
  • With the loss of some "vibrancy" of these areas, residents had reported that "squalid and sleazy behaviour had also fallen
  • There was "no significant" displacement of alcohol-fuelled violence to other precincts
  • The night-time economies of suburbs like Newtown and Double Bay and Bondi benefitted financially from the lock-out laws
But he also found that:
  • Pedestrian traffic fell dramatically in the Sydney CBD and Kings Cross precincts
  • Some venues had closed, although he says the reasons for these closures are "sometimes opaque"
  • Some casual and shift workers had "probably" lost their jobs because of venue closures or reduced trading hours
  • The lockout reduced opportunities to visit and revisit different venues, meet different people and enjoy different entertainment
  • Some live entertainers had lost their jobs
  • The value of the night-time economy, including other businesses such as food "may have been reduced"
coke-sign-kings-cross_opt   Justice Callinan said:  "Of all the groups holding opinions, it seems to me that the medical profession and the emergency workers have the least or no self-interest.  Their opinion, formed on the frontline as it were, must carry a great deal of weight.  On the other hand, autonomy of the individual and freedom of movement and choice are important aspirations. "I have formed the view that the two Precincts at night were grossly overcrowded, violent, noisy, and in places dirty, before the Amendments, but that after them, they were transformed into much safer, quieter and cleaner areas." But he said that cutting off the sale of takeaway alcohol before 10pm made "little or no contribution to violence and anti-social behaviour in the Precincts" and home delivery even less so, recommending extending of the hours of sale of takeaway alcohol at licensed premises until 11pm and home delivered liquor to midnight. Fans of live music will be rejoicing, although they will have to wait until the government makes its decisions on whether the recommendations should be implemented. Justice Callinan has also suggested that "genuine entertainment venues" in the two precincts should be able to let patrons in until 2am and to continue to serve alcohol until 3.30am for a two-year trial period "so long as live entertainment is being generally continuously offered throughout the evening until then." The review was an exhaustive process with more than 1,800 submissions lodged and three round tables held where participants were asked their opinion on the state’s lock-out laws, which stipulate a 1.30am lock out and no alcohol served after 3am in the Sydney CBD entertainment and Kings Cross precincts. The review was set up to consider the state-wide ban on take-away alcohol sales after 10pm, the freeze on new liquor licences in the precincts and periodic liquor licence fee laws, an annual scheme where the fee is based on a venue’s opening hours and risk levels. The laws, which were introduced by then NSW Premier Barry O’Farrell in February 2014 after a string of one-punch assaults, continue to be a hugely emotive issue in NSW. There was a street protest against them in February when about 8000 marched through Sydney. While police and medics have pointed to a significant drop in alcohol-fuelled violence since their introduction, businesses and patrons have complained the constraints they bring have killed Sydney’s nightlife and led to venues closing down, especially around the Cross. There is a large cross-section of people and interest groups who have strong views on the legislation, including CBD and Kings Cross residents, who appear to be enjoying a quieter life and higher property values; live music venues; radio stations who say they have lost sponsors and local councils, who often straddle both camps. Premier Mike Baird has been a staunch defender of the laws as they currently stand but the youth wing of his party, the Young Liberals, does not share his enthusiasm, claiming the restrictions have had a “deleterious effect” on Sydney’s night-time economy and culture. Other supporters of the laws include The Last Drinks Coalition, made up of doctors, nurses, paramedics and police officers, suggested the measures be extended to all NSW venues to combat alcohol-fuelled violence. The Coalition’s submission to the review said: “Prior to the introduction of the modest alcohol laws in Sydney, emergency service workers were at breaking point, having to deal with constant and extreme levels of alcohol-fuelled violence. “The measures have been proven to work in the greater Sydney CBD, so it is important other communities can now benefit from the decrease in alcohol-fuelled violence.” Bbusinesses in the area came out and attacked the restrictions in their submissions. CEO of Merivale Hotel Group Justin Hemmes said in his submission that rules should be based on venue size, not incident numbers.  His Ivy Club in Sydney recorded the highest number of violent incidents (23) in NSW in 2015. Hemmes also complained that the laws have stopped stars like Madonna, the late singer Prince and Drake from getting into some Merivale venues, saying:  “Sydney's reputation as an international dining and hospitality destination is being impacted by reports from tourists and celebrities of our 'nanny state' laws.” You can read the background paper informing the review here. Issues examined by the review included the impact of the laws on public safety, alcohol-related violence and anti-social behaviour; their impact on venue owners, operators and patrons of licensed venues and on related businesses, such as food, and the positive and negative community impacts. It included an analysis of data – both statistical and from interviews and focus groups - on alcohol-related violence and anti-social behaviour, including data from the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and look at whether the laws have shifted drunk patrons and trouble to other suburbs, such as Newtown. The Liquor and Gaming NSW provided technical and secretariat support to the review, which must occur within two years of the laws being introduced. [post_title] => Relax lock-out laws, longer hours for takeaway alcohol says review [post_excerpt] => Review released immediately. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => nsw-lock-law-review-imminent [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-09-16 10:43:39 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-09-16 00:43:39 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=24997 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 2 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 24265 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2016-06-28 13:18:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-06-28 03:18:18 [post_content] => A night time street scene with focus on a "Police Line Do Not Cross" tape across. Queensland is calling time on "alcohol being served after 3am from July 1 in a bid to combat alcohol-fuelled violence. When the new rules kick in next Friday no alcohol will be allowed to be served after 2am state-wide, except in designated safe night precincts – which covers most entertainment areas – where alcohol can be served until 3am. There is also a ban on drinks which cause rapid intoxication being served after midnight. This includes shots, bombs, blasters, test tubes and jelly shots. It also covers drinks containing more than 5 per cent alcohol by volume (including pre-mixed drinks) and those containing more than 45 millilitres of sprits and liqueur. However, the ban does not include cocktails, provided they are listed on a cocktail menu, they are not sold for knockdown prices and “are not designed to be consumed rapidly”, partly because of stiff opposition from small bars. But Queenslanders wanting to keep partying could, for instance, opt for a long island tea, a cocktail which often contains five shots of booze: tequila, gin, vodka, rum and triple sec. "A Long Island Iced Tea sits on the bar, waiting to be served.See other" It is expected that lockout laws will not be introduced until February next year, to give the industry time to prepare. Attorney-General and Minister for Justice Yvette D’Ath said there was widespread support for the new rules, with four in every five Queenslanders supporting cutting off alcohol service beyond 3am. “A survey by the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education (FARE) also found that more than half of Queenslanders felt the city or centre of their town was unsafe on a Saturday night, and of those people, an overwhelming 92% said alcohol was to blame. “Our package of laws is designed to encourage people to feel safe enough to go at night and enjoy the diversity of Queensland’s entertainment and nightlife options," Justice D'Ath said. “The opinion of Queenslanders is clear, and the evidence is clear about the benefits laws like these create.” The measures are also backed by organisations such as the Australian Medical Association, the Queensland Tourism Industry Council, the Royal Australian College of Surgeons, the Queensland Police Union, the Queensland Nurses Union and the Salvation Army. Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk has promised the new laws will “provide a boost to the social life and economy of Queensland’s towns, cities and entertainment precincts”, a claim likely to jar with many Sydney CBD bar and club owners. Similar laws have divided police, patrons, bar owners and medics in Sydney, where the March 2014 laws curbing alcohol service were introduced in a much smaller area, the CBD entertainment district, compared with the Queensland alcohol restrictions, which are state-wide. In Queensland, the backlash has already begun over the new laws, with venues fearing diving profits and business closures, staff fretting over lighter pay packets and patrons complaining they are being over policed. Groups have already sprung up, including No Curfew and Keep Queensland Open and a protest rally is planned in Brisbane this Sunday. There is also anger over the exemption of casinos from the laws, which the government argues is fair as alcohol is not their central trade and they have beefed up security. There is a summary of the changes for industry at www.business.qld.gov.au/tafv and for patrons at www.qld.gov.au/alcohol. [post_title] => Dry July? Queensland booze crackdown imminent [post_excerpt] => Could partying Queenslanders shift to cocktails? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 24265 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-06-30 22:56:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-06-30 12:56:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=24265 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 23102 [post_author] => 671 [post_date] => 2016-02-18 19:25:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2016-02-18 08:25:25 [post_content] => 8296788072_7e28d6b790_b_opt   Thirsty Sydneysiders have been spared the bother of travelling to Brisbane to stay out drinking until daylight: Queensland is getting its own lockout laws. The Sunshine State's  Labor government has followed the precedent set by the New South Wales Coalition by introducing tough new restrictions on after midnight trading hours and late night takeaway alcohol sales in a bid to stop brawls and opportunistic 'one-punch' assaults on unsuspecting victims. Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk secured the passage of the controversial new laws that will force pubs, bars and clubs to stop serving at 2am – or 3am in designated late night entertainment and nightclub precincts – after finally securing the support of the Katter Australia Party and marathon sitting that went into the early hours of Thursday morning. The crackdown on all-hours pub trading comes as part of a suite of hard measures the Queensland is imposing on liquor licensees in an effort to curb the level of violence and serious injury that spill out into the streets when venues shut or refuse entry to already intoxicated patrons. In NSW the lockout laws have been hailed as a major success by the Baird government, police, emergency workers and doctors for substantially reducing serious injury rates. But they are still weathering a high profile barrage of criticism from parts of the hospitality industry and celebrity entrepreneurs like Freelancer.com founder Matt Barrie – who has penned possibly the longest diatribe yet against the NSW lockout restrictions. As the NSW restrictions come under review, Queensland’s Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk was temperately celebrating the passage of the new Tackling Alcohol-Fuelled Violence Amendment Bill in her state as necessary and historic step in the right direction. “Doing nothing is not an option. I’ve spoken to countless doctors, nurses, paramedics, police, parents and grandparents who have urged me to take action to curb alcohol fuelled violence,” Ms Palaszczuk said. “The evidence is clear: reduced trading hours leads to reduced violence, and that’s what this Bill delivers,” Ms Palaszczuk said, adding that she had come good on a promise made to constituents when in opposition. However Queensland’s current LNP Opposition is shouting down the laws, as is the licenced venue industry represented by Our Nightlife Queensland that has warned that 6000 of the sector’s 50,000 jobs could be lost. Our Nightlife Queensland's Nick Braban told ABC that many of the venues that will be hit are small business “that struggle to pay the rent week to week.” Rents have also become an issue in the Sydney CBD. Many newer small-bars and microbreweries are moving to now trendy industrial fringes to take advantage of much cheaper leases and far fewer residents prone to complaining to councils about noise from live music. Despite despondent patrons like Matt Barrie railing against the effective shutdown of Kings Cross as a 24/7 party zone, residents of the Cross and neighbouring Potts Point appear to be relishing the newfound calm that seems to be sending residential rents and prices even further north. Avery public reckoning for the NSW lockout laws is set to play out over coming months. Last week Deputy Premier and Minister for Justice Troy Grant announced that former High Court Justice, the Hon. Ian Callinan AC QC, had been appointed to independently review the lockout laws. Mr Callinan is perhaps best known for his role in establishing establish the 1980s Fitzgerald Inquiry into police corruption in Queensland resulted in the state’s former police commissioner being convicted and sent to prison along with three ministers. The similarly themed Woods Royal Commission that followed in NSW in the mid-1990s exposed entrenched corruption within Kings Cross detectives who effectively gave a green light to criminals and drug dealers to operate in the area. The Callinan Review into NSW final report is due to be handed to the NSW government in August 2016 and a decision on its recommendations due later that year. Submissions can be made here. [post_title] => QLD toasts NSW lockout laws – with its own [post_excerpt] => Doors shut 1am from 2017. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => new-qld-liquor-lockout-laws-passed-by-palaszczuk [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2016-02-19 09:00:28 [post_modified_gmt] => 2016-02-18 22:00:28 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=23102 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 17966 [post_author] => 655 [post_date] => 2015-02-03 09:52:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-02-02 22:52:11 [post_content] => diet pills The article first appeared in the August/September issue of Government News. Continued recreational drug use in Australia presents an urgent challenge for local governments to show leadership to ensure all their staff have a safe workplace, according to testing expert Michael White. A recent United Nations report on worldwide drug use showed that, per capita, Australia has the highest rates of dangerous and illicit drug use in the world. In effect, Australians are the world’s highest users of Ecstasy, Ice and Cannabis, and many of those drug-using Australians work in local government jobs. The variety of potentially dangerous roles carried out by local government employees is of significant concern to Michael White, who says that local governments need to get serious about drugs in the workplace, and develop procedures and protocols to ensure local government worksites are drug-safe. “Council workers are driving trucks, operating heavy machinery, in charge of roadside mowers, bulldozers or forklifts and who are impaired bydrugs are not only putting themselves at risk, but are also seriously endangering their co-workers and communities around them,” said Michael. Many local governments and councils are now working towards creating a drug-safe workplace based upon education and workplace screening. So why is this important to government and council workers, what are the benefits of a drug-safe workplace, and what does being drug-safe actually mean? Firstly let’s look at some key facts about alcohol and other drugs in the workplace:
  • 25 per cent of workplace accidents are drug related;
  • 10 per cent of workplace deaths are drug related;
  • Almost 70 per cent of drug users are in full time employment; and
  • 80 per cent of workplace drug-related injuries involve co-workers or bystanders not drug users.
The use of drugs, even in small amounts can impair performance, judgment, coordination concentration and alertness. On a worksite this can result in mistakes, accidents and injuries, damage to workplace equipment, deterioration in workplace relationships, increased absenteeism and decreased productivity. The laws Under Occupational Health and Safety laws all government employers have a duty of care to their employees. The legislation varies from state to state but the principles remain the same: an employer must provide and maintain a working environment that is safe without risks to health and safety, as well as monitor the health and safety of all employees. Under the same legislation employees must take reasonable care for their own health and safety and that of others.  In effect, that means both employers and employees should not be affected by drugs or alcohol in a way that puts others at risk. Drugs in the workplace A working environment can be viewed as a snapshot of the wider community. Drugs that are consumed recreationally, often at weekends or after work, are more often than not transported to the workplace, not always knowingly. Many people think that consuming alcohol or using drugs out of work hours is private business.  Not true, said Michael, when the effects can have profound ramifications on workplace safety. “Many illicit drugs have effects that can last for many hours, even days and although workers can be using alcohol or drugs in private, many are still turning up to work many hours later impaired by hangovers or with drugs in their system,” said Michael. Common substances The most commonly used of all illicit drugs and subsequently the most commonly found in work place drug testing is marijuana or cannabis. As a result of hydroponics and cultivation the potency of today’s marijuana far outweighs the milder version of the 60’s and 70’s. Today’s high powered cannabis is so strong it can cause psychotic conditions such as paranoid schizophrenia. With effects lasting in the body up to six hours, cannabis presents a real danger in the workplace, with a greater risk of accident and injury, particularly if the employee is operating heavy machinery or driving a vehicle. Cannabis use also results in loss of energy and interest in employee tasks and overall poor performance. Ecstasy is growing in popularity, as it’s reasonably easy to produce, cheap to buy and widely available. Ecstasy is an amphetamine based stimulant or ‘upper’ that works within the user’s central nervous system. The short term effects of amphetamine based drugs include a ‘rush’ which includes speeding up of bodily activities such as heart rate, breathing and blood pressure, the mouth can dry up, sweating increases and fluid loss can cause severe headaches. Ecstasy users will feel more energetic and alert, have increased confidence, reduced appetite and tend to lower their inhibitions or drop their guard. In some people amphetamines will cause irritability, anxiety, depressive, hostile and aggressive behavior. Panic attacks can also occur. Coming down from an amphetamine high can involve violent behavior, tension, radical mood swings, depression and total exhaustion. Often the user will display shaking, sweating and feelings of nausea. Methamphetamine or Ice has become the biggest concern for the Australian police forces nationwide.  Ice stimulates the senses, increases the libido, over heats the body, removes any sense of conscience or responsibility, and makes the user believe that have super strength. Add in paranoia and a tendency towards extreme violence and it becomes one of the most dangerous drugs available. The most dangerous effect is that Ice keeps users in this state for three or four days followed by the worst hangover imaginable. A council worker using Ice is nothing but a danger to themselves and those working with them. Alcohol is the most widely used psychoactive or mood changing recreational drug in Australia, and when mixed with other illicit drugs the results can be disastrous.  Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, not a stimulant as commonly thought. Depending on various circumstances including the amount of consumed, alcohol can have some seriously debilitating effects including increased confusion, reduced coordination, slurred speech, poor muscle control, blurred vision. Heavy consumption of alcohol over time can cause permanent damage to many parts of the body including impairment of brain and liver functions. Creating a Drug-Safe Workplace programme Identifying alcohol and drug use in the workplace as part of an ongoing drug screening programme is relatively simple. “There are a variety of screening techniques and processes for testing including breathalysers for alcohol, and urine or oral fluid sampling for illicit drugs,” said Michael. “Workplace drug testing, combined with implementing alcohol and other drugs policies, developing staff induction processes, training workshops, drug awareness programmes and management courses, will mean that local government workplaces and communities can move toward being drug-safe,” he said. “Being a drug-safe work place has benefits for local government employers and employees alike. Not only are employers fulfilling their legislative requirements, reducing the cost of absenteeism and ensuring workplace safety, employees and their families can rest assured that the chance of accident or injury at work can be significantly reduced,” said Michael. Here are some simple steps to creating a drug-safe workplace:
  1. Engage a NATA accredited, on-site organisation that can assist you with a full spectrum of options and solutions.
  2. Ensure you have a good and legally robust alcohol and other drugs policy that spells out the details in easy to comprehend language.
  3. Conduct alcohol and other drug education and awareness workshops where you can introduce the policies as part of the discussion process.
  4. Introduce a new staff and contractor d  rug-safe induction process to ensure that no bad habits can be recruited into the organisation going forward.
  5. Train WHS managers or supervisors to conduct alcohol and drug tests as part of a return to work process for those employees who may have been identified as drug users and need to take some time off to clean out their systems.
  6. Conduct a blanket screen of all employees to establish a base-line to measure performance and identify hot-spots that need focus. This allows an affordable sensible random screening schedule that concentrates on the areas of highest risk.
  7. Review reports and manage the program over time to ensure the original objectives are being achieved.
Case study A NSW North Coast council office received reports from colleagues and local community members that workers were behaving dangerously and erratically. The incidents were overlooked until a worker drove through a built up area with a cherry picker in an upright position, bringing down power lines and blacking out several streets. Upon investigation it was found that the crew was cultivating and using marijuana within their workplace, out of sight of the management. The GM introduced a Frontline Diagnostics drug-safe workplace programme which identified 100 per cent drug use within the crew who were stood down until they could show they were clean and could return to work. After four months of education workshops, blanket screening and introducing an induction process, the staff have no drugs at all in their system. Absenteeism and productivity has greatly improved and there are no longer risks of drug-related accidents. Michael White established Frontline Diagnostics, Australia’s largest workplace drug testing agency, in 1999 to provide Australian industry with a complete solution for the detection, management and control of alcohol and other drugs in the workplace. www.frontlinediagnostics.com.au   [post_title] => Staying drug-safe at work [post_excerpt] => Drug testing at work. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => staying-drug-safe-at-work [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-02-06 11:03:34 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-02-06 00:03:34 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=17966 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [10] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 15809 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2014-07-31 15:47:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2014-07-31 05:47:41 [post_content] => a hard-earned thirst needs a big cold beer A free smartphone app designed to help current and ex-Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel and veterans manage their drinking has been updated with new features, including being able to email an individual’s drinking history to a doctor or to themselves. ON TRACK with The Right Mix, (iTunes download ; Android download) which was originally launched in March 2013 and can also be used by civilians, allows people to chart their drinking history and spending over the bar across time to reveal the short and long-term impact that a few too many can have on your life and fitness. The update comes as thousands of battle-hardened Australian troops previously on deployment in Afghanistan return home following the wind-down of operations and re-enter civilian life. A real concern for both the military and health practitioners is effectively managing the effects of post-traumatic-stress-disorder that has previously been linked to harmful self-medication using substances lime alcohol. A key feature of the alcohol app is its ability to create highly personalised well-being scores that takes into account crucial factors like gender, age, height and weight. For present and retired personnel, that means a private and discrete heads-up about how drinking behaviour, moderate or otherwise, translates to health and financial outcomes before the consequences become more difficult to manage. For those prepared to sweat-out the liquid calories the next day, the app shows how much exercise you need to do to burn-off the booze. It can also alert you when you’ve reached your budget when sinking a few off-base. Among the new the new exercise options integrated into the phone app are golf, chin-ups, sit-ups, push-ups, running and swimming. There’s also a graph that tracks your drinking, spending and wellbeing to help individuals better understand their drinking patterns, while a ‘recent drinks’ option on the tracking screen lets those imbibing quickly choose from their last five drinks. In the event you let things slide and forget to add drinks to your phone on-the-go, it’s is now possible to retrospectively add drinks to past sessions or even add a new session to your drinking history. The issue of managing a culture of recreational drinking has long been a challenge for the ADF and has, over the last few years been brought into sharper focus by top brass because of its unwanted contribution to a string of serious incidents that have landed personnel in court or on disciplinary charges. Two of the most serious scandals have been the 2011 ‘Skype’ sex incident at the elite Australian Defence Force Academy and multiple reports of drunkenness, nudity and sexual harassment on board the HMAS Success’ tour through Asia in 2009. The ON TRACK with The Right Mix was developed in the wake of the 2011 independent report The Use of Alcohol in the Australian Defence Force which found that 26.4 per cent of ADF members reported drinking alcohol at hazardous or harmful levels, and particularly lower-ranked men under 25. The same report also found that Navy personnel were more than three times more likely to have an alcohol disorder than Air Force personnel, while Army personnel were had double the chance of Air Force personnel of developing an alcohol disorder. The report said: “Alcohol use is common among ADF personnel and while many drink in moderation, there is also a high prevalence of drinking at hazardous levels, at least on some occasions.” It also noted that this situation had existed for “a considerable time” and documented the ramifications of binge drinking, including reduced unit and service performance and, “collateral damage to the public image and reputation of the services, both within Australia and internationally.” [post_title] => Shout out to diggers through fortified alcohol management app [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => shout-diggers-fortified-alcohol-management-app [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-08-01 12:05:26 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-08-01 02:05:26 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=15809 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw ) [11] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6872 [post_author] => 655 [post_date] => 2013-01-07 11:23:32 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-01-07 11:23:32 [post_content] => By Paul Hemsley and Julian Bajkowski When the tragic death of Thomas Kelly in Kings Cross from a so-called king-hit made headlines across Australia, it was the final straw for the O’Farrell government. After several months of dramatic news reports filled with colourful identities and bikies parading their power, shootings in crowded streets and seemingly weekly drunken brawls, something have to give. Kings Cross has long been regarded as the New South Wales’ seamiest 24-hour-a day party hotspot. It’s streets are festooned with beer barns, strip-joints, beefy bouncers, brothels, tattoo parlours and crime lords – not to mention the occasional of police corruption scandal and a dedicated series television show Underbelly. But there are much deeper issues confronting the Cross than the three minute nightly news grabs laced with drama can convey and the ongoing debate over whether there is sufficient regulation and enforcement of liquor licencing is chief among them. Licenced venues precinct are now bracing for the policy repercussions after Premier Barry O’Farrell very publicly tried to call time on wild nights of excess. Drug dogs will now routinely patrol trains and patrons will have their identity documents scanned and recorded. Opinions vary widely still out on whether new measures will have any impact. Notably, many licensed venues, backed by a formidable lobbying machine, will still be allowed continue trading well through the hours of the early morning. Many of the new restrictions followed a withering audit by the Office of Liquor, Gaming and Racing, which recommended ‘dramatic change’ for the venues in the Cross. Mr O’Farrell says the problem is that people are sold alcohol until they are drunk, then thrown out with the problem then transferred to the streets. “This is not what the community wants in what should be a vibrant and safe nightspot,” Mr O’Farrell says, adding that the audit found a large disparity between the number of people being refused service because they were drunk and the number of people being turfed out for being drunk. The state government has now told venues that they will not be allowed to serve neat shots or doubles measures or potent premixed ready-to-drink beverages after midnight. Buying more than four alcoholic drinks after midnight has also been banned and two Responsible Service of Alcohol marshals must be on duty in each venue from 11pm with no alcohol allowed to be served in the hour before closing. The City of Sydney also responded by announcing six new closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras to be installed in the area extending the coverage area along the Darlinghurst Road ‘strip’ from Williams Street Crossing to Macleay Street and in Bayswater Road. Mayor Clover Moore says that she has called on the state government to increase policing in the inner-city because of large crowds of intoxicated people engaging in serious crime and anti-social behaviour. Ms Moore has repeatedly complained that successive NSW Governments have focused on locking people up instead of tackling the causes of crime. President of the Local Government Association of NSW, Keith Rhoades says councils have also repeatedly called for greater liquor licencing controls over the past decade. “At the last state election the LGSA called for all political parties seeking election to introduce restrictions on the sale of alcohol at pubs and clubs across NSW as detailed in the Last Drinks campaign,” Mr Rhoades says. Councils need to submit a Community Impact Statement (CIS) to the Casino, Liquor, Gaming and Racing Authority to determine a liquor licencing application. “Councils have varying views on how much notice is taken of their input as a stakeholder at the CIS stage and many feel it is not given enough status,” Mr Rhoades says. But industry groups like the Distilled Spirits Industry Council of Australia (DSICA) are deeply sceptical of the effectiveness of the latest restrictions and complain the government is targeting only distilled spirits. DSICA spokesman Stephen Riden tells Government News that while his group supports the intention of the restrictions to reduce violence in Kings Cross, they’re baffled by the specific drink bans. He argues the issue is that Kings Cross has a “really bad culture” and that “very large part of the problem” is an entrenched expectation of trouble. “[It] attracts the people looking to cause trouble [and] young people who want to be where things are edgy and [near] that kind of vibe of possible danger,” Mr Riden says. The banning of only spirits at certain hours is definite sore point. “It’s a mystery,” Mr Riden says. “And we think it’s repeating the mistakes of the alcopops tax.” Conversely, the Australian Institute of Criminology (AIG) tells Government News that similar strategies used by governments outside NSW to ease violence have actually worked. Uncertainty over communication between state and local government on curbing violence has led to more problems. Mr Rhoades says councils restrict the sale and consumption of alcohol by applying development consent conditions on the development application of a proposed business as a way to prevent crime and address community safety and noise concerns. “However, the general sentiment across councils that experience the cumulative impacts of large and or increasing numbers of venues is that current liquor licensing controls are insufficient,” he says. Most councils work with other agencies, such as the Police, on Liquor Accords with their local pubs, clubs, restaurants and bars to address issues relating to those venues. But assessing whether the state government’s restrictions actually work is a difficult endeavour. Even NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research director, Don Weatherburn was declined to comment on the issue. Mr Weatherburn told Government News that he couldn’t comment on announced government policy and did not want to be accused of having a declared position on the topic. However, the Australian Institute of Criminology’s senior analyst, Anthony Morgan says Kings Cross is an area that has received a lot of attention, which has resulted in a government response. Mr Morgan says Newcastle’s entertainment district has stricter restrictions than those of Kings Cross, including a lockout and an earlier closing times for licenced premises. Premises that were open until 6am were only allowed to trade until 3am particular types of alcohol could only be sold at certain hours. “There was really good evidence that it actually had a significant impact on assaults in the Newcastle Entertainment District compared to similar areas,” Mr Morgan says. He notes all the components assessed were related to violence. These included the consumption of particular drinks, levels of consumption and the actual number of hours that venues were open and could sell the drinks. Morgan says it’s difficult to assess whether these strategies actually make the streets and venues safer – because there have been many different strategies implemented. However there is evidence that good enforcement of responsible service of alcohol can work, Mr Morgan says. “It does need a strong enforcement component be it be it by police or by the licencing authority to make sure licenced premises are complying with those restrictions,” Mr Morgan says. He says AIC did a study of the ACT police showing that the police maintained a high level of enforcement had a short term positive impact on assaults. “Assuming that enforcement is sustained over time, then you would expect longer term impact on assault levels,” he says. According to Mr Morgan, jurisdictions including Kings Cross have liquor accords where licencees work with police and licencing authorities to come up with solutions. These have included restrictions on certain drinks and getting rid of ‘happy hours’, which are no longer allowed in NSW. A side effect of an increased police presence and restrictions on certain areas is that more cases of violence and arrests are reported. It is a potentially vicious cycle for affected areas as governments attempt to make them safer with more police patrol and more restrictions, but it may give the perception that these areas are even less safe. “Obviously a lot of attention is being given to Kings Cross in response to a high profile and tragic event,” Mr Morgan says. The reporting of violence has an impact on peoples’ perceptions of an area and perceptions of safety, he says. “Those perceptions don’t necessarily accord with the actual levels of safety in an area,” Mr Morgan says. He argues that these types of “random” incidents involving two individuals who don’t know one another aren’t as common as people might think, based on the reporting that actually takes place. “If you draw attention as what has happened with Kings Cross, you get a response. But at the same time, you do tend to increase peoples’ concern about what might be there,” he says. He says its about balancing the risks or the perceived risks to business operators in terms of lost revenue. “[It’s about] The potential to improve public safety which might actually increase the number of people visiting the entertainment precinct,” he says. [post_title] => O'Farrell cracks down on nocturnal drunks [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => ofarrell-cracks-down-on-nocturnal-drunks [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-02-11 12:34:52 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-02-11 01:34:52 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [12] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5977 [post_author] => 655 [post_date] => 2010-09-14 16:13:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2010-09-14 16:13:24 [post_content] =>

By Lilia Guan

Darwin City Council has welcomed a Northern Territory Government initiative to stamp out alcohol fuelled violence and crime.

Communities within Darwin and Palmerston were encouraged on Tuesday to add their voices to the NT Government’s Alcohol Management Plan (APM).

Launched in early September, the AMP was designed to help the community work with councils and Government to put in place actions that will address alcohol related harms within the community.

John Banks, general manager of community and cultural services at Darwin City Council said consultation was being sought from both Indigenous and non-Indigenous residents.

He said a community education campaign has been rolled out to inform residents and industry members about the AMP.

“The campaign includes recommendations on the control of retail alcohol sales, trading hours and identification to purchase alcohol to address problem drinkers,” Mr Banks said.

The AMP also included an introduction of designated areas in the local CBDs to allow the police to issue on the spot fines or ban problem drinkers; introduction of a Banned Drinker Register; review and extend dry areas and ban the sale of four and five litre casks.

Banks said the Council has for a number of years needed an alcohol management plan. 

“The alcohol problem in Darwin has been above national standards,” he said.

“This has had led to greater levels of violence, higher number of accidents, assaults and the general ill effects of alcohol.”

[post_title] => Darwin tackles alcohol fuelled violence [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => darwin-tackles-alcohol-fuelled-violence [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2014-02-11 12:15:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2014-02-11 01:15:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 13 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 26714 [post_author] => 658 [post_date] => 2017-03-31 11:24:36 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-03-31 00:24:36 [post_content] =>

Alcohol could soon be sold in Australian petrol stations, corner shops and supermarkets.    
By Ben Hagemann and Lucy Marrett 
.
Convenience stores, petrol stations and supermarkets should be allowed to sell alcoholic beverages, according to a Senate inquiry report into the effects of red tape on alcohol sales.Tabled in parliament yesterday at 5:45pm, the interim report recommended that the Australian Government and COAG (Council of Australian Governments) should allow “packaged alcohol to be sold in convenience stores, petrol stations and supermarkets”, and “support the sale and supply of alcohol through consideration and implementation of evidence-based policies that aim to reduce red tape and promote job creation, and business growth and investment.” The report was originally scheduled for tabling on 14 March 2017. The Red Tape Committee was established in October 2016, and as part of its inquiry, has looked at the effect of red tape on the economy and community while focusing on a number of factors, including the assessment and reduction of red tape legislation in relation to the sale of alcohol.
  Read more here. This story first appeared in C&I Week.  [post_title] => Red Tape Committee approves booze sales in supermarkets, shops and servos [post_excerpt] => Senate inquiry backs abolishing liquor store trading hours. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => red-tape-committee-approves-booze-sales-convenience-stores [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-03-31 11:28:12 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-03-31 00:28:12 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26714 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 13 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 9ce928b42e932abc164e9f5338fd50e9 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

alcohol

alcohol

a hard-earned thirst needs a big cold beer

Shout out to diggers through fortified alcohol management app

A free smartphone app designed to help current and ex-Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel and veterans manage their drinking has been updated with new features, including being able to email an individual’s drinking history to a doctor or to themselves. ON TRACK with The Right Mix, (iTunes download ; Android download) which was originally launched […]

O’Farrell cracks down on nocturnal drunks

By Paul Hemsley and Julian Bajkowski When the tragic death of Thomas Kelly in Kings Cross from a so-called king-hit made headlines across Australia, it was the final straw for the O’Farrell government. After several months of dramatic news reports filled with colourful identities and bikies parading their power, shootings in crowded streets and seemingly […]

Darwin tackles alcohol fuelled violence

By Lilia Guan Darwin City Council has welcomed a Northern Territory Government initiative to stamp out alcohol fuelled violence and crime. Communities within Darwin and Palmerston were encouraged on Tuesday to add their voices to the NT Government’s Alcohol Management Plan (APM). Launched in early September, the AMP was designed to help the community work with […]