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      By Deborah Jackson, Editor National Liquor News A proposal to ban alcohol advertising on public transport in Western Australia has been slammed by the alcohol industry. The Western Australia Labor party has announced that a future Labor Government would honour current advertising contracts but would ban all new advertising of alcohol-related products on public transport. It is understood that the Liberal-led Government does not support a ban because advertising on public transport generates about $7 million in revenue per year of which about 10 per cent is generated through alcohol-related advertising, and all advertising on public assets must comply with industry advertising standards, which is the case in WA. Fergus Taylor, the Executive Director of Alcohol Beverages Australia (ABA) said that the Labor Government's stance is poorly thought out and is not supported by credible research or data. “This is a poor policy decision taken on the run without industry consultation and isn’t even supported by official Government data,” Taylor said. “The government has made a sensible decision to reject this proposal after a more thorough assessment of the evidence.   Read more here. This story first appeared in The Shout.  [post_title] => Proposed booze advertising ban on WA public transport [post_excerpt] => But $7m revenue at stake. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => booze-ban-wa-public-transport [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-17 11:39:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-17 00:39:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26270 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 20338 [post_author] => 664 [post_date] => 2015-06-29 16:31:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-06-29 06:31:23 [post_content] => SYDNEY●AUSTRALIA●2DAY   Sydney’s Central Station has seen many revamps over the years, including a major realignment of approach roads and other access points in the 1990s. Now it has a dual role as a train station and an advertising vehicle. Central Railway is supposed to be the state’s centrepiece railway station, but it has struggled at times. Its initial location south of the CBD made little sense when it was opened in 1906 – it was until not the construction of Sydney’s underground system in the 1920s and the opening of Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1933 that it assumed its present role as the hub of Sydney’s public transport system. Now there has been another change. The NSW Government has unveiled a new high-tech Customer Service Centre in the middle of the concourse -- the same spot where a grand wooden indicator board stood until was replaced with TV monitors in 1982. The much loved board was removed only with much complaint and is now in the Powerhouse Museum. (Rail history buffs will attest that Sydney's art deco era Clyde station still retains a wooden indicator board and remains devoid of electronic platform monitors giving it almost cult status as the destination that time forgot.) clyde wooden board With the latest Central revamp train arrivals and departures are now displayed on an 11 metre long digital information board made up of 20 individual screens. The giant screen also contains information about major events – and advertising – along with a tourist information kiosk and a mobile device charging station. Andrew Constance, NSW Minister for Transport and Infrastructure, toured and officially opened the new centre at Central Station on Monday. He also announced the introduction of a Concession Opal card for job seekers, and an upgrade to the Transport NSW website. But it is the pervasiveness of advertising on the train system that most people have noticed. Large scale talking billboards now verbally harangue commuters at major city stations, and even some destination boards are now displaying advertising, though these appear to be trials. Trains themselves are also on track to being gradually converted into advertising vehicles, a move the state government has cashed-in on in more ways than one. Many rail commuters in NSW were surprised when Premier Mike Baird made a cameo appearance in a video advertisement for Sydney's Daily Telegraph newspaper posing as a train traveling reader of the tabloid. Meanwhile, selling space on and around the railway network has become big business. Advertising for Sydney Transport is now outsourced to four separate advertising companies: APN Outdoor (Billboard and ‘cross track’), Adshel (Station platforms and concourses, including the ominous sounding‘station domination), Torch Media (train exteriors) and S&J Media Group (train interiors). Announcing the contracts in December 2013, then Minister for Transport Gladys Berejiklian said that “the new advertising contracts are expected to double the revenue Sydney Trains receives through advertising to at least $100 million over five years, unlocking the potential that has long been underutilised across the network.” There you have it. The NSW state government quite clearly sees empty space on trains and platforms as ‘underutilised potential’. And here’s a lurk. When the previous contracts were announced, Sydney Trains Director of Customer Service Liz Ward said the increased advertising would “make it easier for customers to find their way around our stations as by using more scrolling and digital advertising we’re able to reduce the amount of other advertising around the station, making directional signs easier to spot." That’s settled, then. [post_title] => Sydney's Central Railway revamp sells more ads [post_excerpt] => Sydney's Central Railway Station has unveiled a high-tech visual revamp. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => sydneys-central-railway-revamp-sells-more-ads [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-06-29 23:06:51 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-06-29 13:06:51 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=20338 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19612 [post_author] => 671 [post_date] => 2015-05-18 15:47:02 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-18 05:47:02 [post_content] => [caption id="attachment_19615" align="alignnone" width="290"]Opal Card IMG_5880 Pic: Beau Giles[/caption]   It must be what every style-conscious Sydney commuter has been secretly craving for months: a brightly coloured, government issued accessory range of branded smartphone covers for your OPAL Card that lets you slip your ticket down the back of your mobile device. Or how about a dedicated and embossed black “minimal unisex leather card wallet” that’s “tailored especially” for what would otherwise be just another plastic card for just $29.95 plus postage and handling? After years of languishing on the sidelines of official design dagginess, the New South Wales government has transformed itself into a modern day metrosexual style merchant -- and it’s quite a makeover. Forget the imitation Lotus cum Waratah logo that’s meant to give graphic credibility to the machinery of state government. These days it’s the accessories, especially smart and digital ones, that count and your government is more than happy to clip the ticket and sell you an iPhone cover. OPal phone cover Merchandising from government agencies and transport providers used to consist of the ubiquitous conference pen or some stickers or promo posters from the makers of a new train, bus or bridge. But these days selling a city’s brand through its transit experience is big dollars and a serious income stream, if executed well online. Transport for London, from which Sydney has borrowed more than a few reformist ideas, has been selling Underground and Tube merchandising for decades after realising visitors wanted a souvenir of its iconic schematic or an officially issued ‘Mind The Gap t-shirt. Now Sydney’s actively cashing in on the action with products that include Sydney Ferries and Red Rattler cufflinks, destination-based tea towels, children’s books, beach towels, umbrellas, postcards, aprons, mugs and calendars. The state government has also taken a leaf out of Amazon’s book by making its official gift store an online first affair, collecting some digital kudos and saving on some bricks and mortar rent along the way (which is helpful if you’re selling off excess CBD real estate). Quietly launched by the Department of Transport in March 2014, the government’s online merchandising shop has been steadily chalking-up sales and expanding its range to cash in on hot commuter demand. According to Transport for Sydney, in just a year it’s sold more than 6000 units of stock across “Opal accessories and the broader Transport branded merchandise range.” A Transport for NSW spokesperson told Government News, the online shop is operated and managed by DKM Global Pty Ltd Trading as DKM Blue, who in turn is licensed by Transport for NSW to design, manufacture and advertise merchandise. The crafty state government is also branching out into bricks and mortar retailers and convenience stores by pushing its Opal branded phone accessories into “select CBD EzyMart stores” with plans afoot to expand the distribution network “to additional key retailers.” But could other cities and government agencies also cash in on the act? Canberra’s national institutions, like Parliament House, National Gallery and National Library and the Royal Australian Mint attract significant tourist patronage and all have well stocked gift shops that do a healthy  trade. But Government News couldn’t find any merchandise for the National Capital’s ACTION bus service, even though it’s likely to be the only bus service in Australia that encourages its patrons bring along their pushbikes for the ride thanks to specially mounted racks on the front of its vehicles. Similarly, we couldn’t find a single spy agency shop between ASIO, ASIS, ASD, AGO, DIO or ONA despite having souvenired a small collection of trophy coffee cups, beer glasses and table coasters from most of the above courtesy of various conferences. ASIO’s conspicuous new $700 million office may not welcome sight-seeing tourists, but we reckon some t-shirts, fridge magnets and tea towels could go some way to recouping the cost of spontaneously bursting windows. And besides, what's not to like about an officially branded puzzle book from ASD (nee DSD) , the people who spend millions hacking, cracking and whacking Australia’s online adversaries? We reckon it’d be a best seller. Sodoku. So five minutes ago. [post_title] => Transport NSW cashes-in on hipster commuter merchandise [post_excerpt] => iPhone covers that fit smartcard tickets sell like hotcakes. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => transport-nsw-cashes-in-on-hipster-commuter-merchandise [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-22 13:09:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-22 03:09:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=19612 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 1 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 19526 [post_author] => 659 [post_date] => 2015-05-12 12:09:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2015-05-12 02:09:15 [post_content] => no drugs A national addiction to scaremongering drug rhetoric and fighting “the war on drugs” stigmatises drug addicts and reduces their chances for recovery, says a Victorian drug and alcohol researcher, in the wake of the publication of the first in-depth Australian study on what life is like for recovering addicts. Associate Professor David Best from drug and alcohol treatment and research centre Turning Point, said that the May 2015  Australian Life In Recovery Survey, which was carried out by Turning Point and Sydney private addiction treatment clinic South Pacific Private, showed that addicts  could recover from their addiction with multiple benefits to the individual, their loved ones and to society. The survey found that recovering addicts were more likely to keep custody of their children, hold down a job or stay in college, reconnect with their families, look after their health and refrain from driving under the influence or committing other crimes. They were also less likely to end up in prison or in a hospital emergency department, ignore their HIV or hepatitis status or have a violent home life. Professor Best said these “stories of hope” needed to be shared and their successes examined to create pathways out of addiction. He said personal accounts of recovery could help humanise addicts and counteract the incendiary language around drugs and the unbalanced policy directions this created, as well as how negatively drug users were perceived. “It’s crucial that policy makers are more optimistic about recovery and switch the funding model from primarily acute services to get a balance between acute treatment and long-term recovery,” Prof Best said. He said people in recovery were often discriminated against because people like landlords, college tutors and employers thought individuals did not really recover and expected them to relapse, “so their social exclusion is much harder”. Last week, the government launched a graphic televised anti-ice campaign, showing people on ice being violent to doctors and family members and drug-induced violence in a regional town. In April, Prime Minister Tony Abbott announced a National Ice Taskforce, calling methylamphetamine a ‘scourge’ and an “epidemic” and vowing to crackdown on its manufacture, importation and sale. The Taskforce is due to submit a report in mid-June. Mr Abbott said at the time: “The propensity for violence, the propensity to subsequent very serious mental illness, the propensity to disfigurement which ice produces means that this is a drug epidemic way beyond anything that we have seen before. “The trouble with ice is that is far more potent, far more dangerous, and far more addictive than any previous illicit drug. It is worse than heroin, it is worse than cocaine, it is worse than LSD, it is worse than ecstasy.” Since then drug researchers have poured cold water on Mr Abbott's assertion that there is an ice epidemic - the rate of methamphetamine use in Australia has remained stable since 2001, around 2 per cent of the population - and cautioned against running apocalyptic anti-drug campaigns. Some drug and alcohol workers have said such campaigns can backfire and lead to an increase in drug use because they normalise it and reinforce perceptions of it being common. They have also countered that appealing to young people to act rationally is not necessarily effective. Professor Best said the rate of return on investment was much better from demand reduction (treatment and recovery) for drugs than from policies attacking supply reduction and this was a well-established view. “Part of this is about seeing to be doing the right thing and being hard on drugs and drug dealers,” he said. “There’s always going to be that rhetoric politically when they demonise substances, it just makes it harder for people to recover afterwards because doors are shut to them.” While he does not argue that ice is a dangerous drug he says alcohol, cannabis and prescription drug abuse are much bigger problems. In addition to an obsession with policing drug supply and use, Prof Best said a “doctor driven” model was pursued at the cost of long-term recovery that assumed once a person was physically off drugs they would be fine; sometimes at the expense of connecting people to stable relationships, jobs and homes which prevented them from relapsing. “[We’ve been] trying to go for technical solutions when the solutions appear to be much more social,” Prof Best said. “If you don’t give on-going support you’re effectively wasting your money. There’s no point in short-term treatments if you’re not going to offer pathways out of it.” He said there was a 50 to 70 per cent relapse rate if people went back to the same lives and stresses they had left behind as they struggled to cope with the same unstable relationships, home and work-life. “The quality of ongoing recovery support services is terrible and dreadfully funded,” Prof Best said. “It’s often little community groups not well funded and struggling to survive.” What’s needed, said Prof Best, is a stronger commitment to the notion of integration and meaningful activity, whether it’s volunteering, sports clubs, churches, or community groups like Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous, as well as better links to employment and training providers and housing. “Addiction leaves a big hole in people’s lives. It’s been pretty much a full-time job for a lot of people,” Prof Best said. “What makes people not relapse to drug use or crime is having a more social stake in society: families and employment. There’s nothing medical or clinical about these solutions.” Indeed, Australia appears to be falling behind in the efforts to provide a meaningful existence for people in recovery in comparison to countries like the UK, which have invented some highly innovative programs to help people reclaim their place in society. One scheme run by the Lancashire Police in Blackpool, northern England, called Jobs, Friends and Houses, trains ex-addicts in building techniques. Teams renovate old bed and breakfasts and when they’re finished half are sold and the remainder used for supported housing. Not only does it give people jobs and homes but it is also self-financing and no drain on the public purse, said Prof Best. “It’s a massively innovative financial model. Better than charity handouts or government grants. I don’t think the models in Australia are very impressive.” But some Australian projects are making in-roads, like Oxford Houses, although the original model was from the US. This is supported housing or, as Prof Best calls it, “communal living as a phased response”, where people are housed with more experienced peers and  expected to pay their own rent (through benefits at first, if necessary) and look for a job. It is a successful model but there are only eight of these in Australia  and they are all in Melbourne. Prof Best said alternatives, such as residential rehabilitation, were also lacking. Access is very restricted in Australia and currently reserved for those with the most complex needs who have an alcohol and drug addiction but also problems in other areas such as mental health and family relationships. But it’s not cheap, Prof Best cites UK figures of around $10,000 for a six-month stay, but points out that it is less than one-quarter to one-third of the cost of keeping somebody in prison. [post_title] => Drugs: recovery, not rhetoric [post_excerpt] => Drug addicts can recover: first Australian survey. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => drugs-recovery-not-rhetoric [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2015-05-12 12:52:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-05-12 02:52:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=19526 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 6950 [post_author] => 655 [post_date] => 2013-03-12 08:57:55 [post_date_gmt] => 2013-03-12 08:57:55 [post_content] =>

By Julian Bajkowski

The New South Wales Government has put the creative and digital services contracts of its $92 million-a-year advertising and public awareness scheme out to pitch, trimming around $24 million in traditional ad-spend in favour of ramping up digital communications to stakeholders.

Macquarie Street now estimates that it will spend between $5 million and $10 million-a-year on creative and digital services with agencies through an overarching scheme run out of the Strategic Communications branch of the Department of Premier and Cabinet.

“Rather than a broad-based scheme that includes all streams of known communications and advertising activity, the Scheme will encompass the activities common across Customers that represent the majority of government’s marketing services spend,” procurement documents released by the government said.

“Whilst availability of traditional advertising agency creative services are still critical to some customers, the delivery of government information through new and cost efficient digital channels is increasing in importance and thus Government requires access to expertise in this area.”

According to the government, the call for creative services under the scheme does not yet include media buying.

“The NSW Government Media Agency Services agreement is currently being prepared for renewal. The media agencies contracted under that agreement will plan and buy media for all advertising activities and therefore media planning and buying services are excluded from this Scheme,” the documents said.

The move essentially centralise buying and run digital marketing services procurement out of Premier and Cabinet signals a strong shift towards creating a more holistic and coordinated online presence for the state’s public sector after a decade of often ad-hoc initiatives and occasional collisions with the technology sector.

Governments across Australia are increasingly looking to steer the public towards using online channels as a way of improving and speeding-up service delivery while reducing more expensive face-to-face interactions where the public are required to stand in queues.

A key area of interest for New South Wales has been harnessing the reach and feedback potential of social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook to get messages to the public that range from revealing the top baby names officially registered in a given year to the premier apologising for underperforming train services.

However the tight levels of administrative control exercised over how public agencies can communicate in the public domain have sometimes made for an uncomfortable fit with the increased consumer demand for real-time information.

To this end it now appears that the NSW Government could be preparing to increasingly outsource digital communications to marketing and communications agencies.

“Digital services may include development and implementation of holistic digital strategies, building websites, and the utilisation of emergent new media channels. These services are in some cases supplied through creative agencies but also through specialist service providers,” the procurement documents said.

The advertising and marketing shake-up presents yet another challenge to traditional newspaper publishers and free-to-air broadcasters which increasingly have to contend with the evaporation of government jobs and public notice advertising.

The cut-off date for tenders to be submitted to the new scheme is 28th April 2013 at 11:45pm.

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      By Deborah Jackson, Editor National Liquor News A proposal to ban alcohol advertising on public transport in Western Australia has been slammed by the alcohol industry. The Western Australia Labor party has announced that a future Labor Government would honour current advertising contracts but would ban all new advertising of alcohol-related products on public transport. It is understood that the Liberal-led Government does not support a ban because advertising on public transport generates about $7 million in revenue per year of which about 10 per cent is generated through alcohol-related advertising, and all advertising on public assets must comply with industry advertising standards, which is the case in WA. Fergus Taylor, the Executive Director of Alcohol Beverages Australia (ABA) said that the Labor Government's stance is poorly thought out and is not supported by credible research or data. “This is a poor policy decision taken on the run without industry consultation and isn’t even supported by official Government data,” Taylor said. “The government has made a sensible decision to reject this proposal after a more thorough assessment of the evidence.   Read more here. This story first appeared in The Shout.  [post_title] => Proposed booze advertising ban on WA public transport [post_excerpt] => But $7m revenue at stake. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => booze-ban-wa-public-transport [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2017-02-17 11:39:48 [post_modified_gmt] => 2017-02-17 00:39:48 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => http://www.governmentnews.com.au/?p=26270 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 5 [max_num_pages] => 1 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => 1 [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => 1 [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 738c8f6916b3a1f69eaa1c6c5c3dae50 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => 1 [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )

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NSW puts advertising and digital services out to pitch

By Julian Bajkowski The New South Wales Government has put the creative and digital services contracts of its $92 million-a-year advertising and public awareness scheme out to pitch, trimming around $24 million in traditional ad-spend in favour of ramping up digital communications to stakeholders. Macquarie Street now estimates that it will spend between $5 million […]